Book XX Required For Play

So there seems to be a mini-trend developing - Radiant is a new way to play Exalted that requires the Exalted core book for reference. Apocalypse D&D is a mashup of D&D and Apocalypse World that requires the (A?)D&D player's handbook for reference.
Anyone seen any other such games?
This makes me want to pick up my copy of Mage: the Ascension or Unknown Armies and reimagine such a game with a new system, but somehow require or encourage use of the original game's book to play the new faux-clone.

Comments

  • We're doing this all the time with Solar System nowadays around here, it seems. When I adapt another game's setting into SS I am not usually that enthused by the setting alone - I also want to adapt the pertinent mechanical approaches that give the game its particular feel. The end-result is a game that pretty much requires the other game's book for setting information and crunch reference even while it runs on Solar System.
  • I don't know if this counts, but Murderland requires the gameboard and pieces from the game CLUE. Instead of trying to figure out whodunnit, you're trying to kill off all the other characters while searching for a duffel bag with a couple million bucks.
  • Someone over at the Classic Traveller boards reimagined D&D through Traveller

    D&D Traveller

    ara
  • Elizabeth,
    I absolutely think that Murderland is an example of that phenomenon. That might just be a good "starter" RPG for folks, too!
    I sat down and tried to come up with some ideas for creating an "homage game" for Mage, but all I could think up was stuff that looked an awful lot like Radiant. That's not a bad thing, but I'll have to wait for inspiration to really strike before I come up with anything more distinctive.
  • edited May 2010
    Actually, this is kind of a reversal of how things have previously been done: A setting book that requires some other system book. Off the top of my head I can think of Delta Green requiring CoC and Dictionary of Mu requiring Sorcerer. Instead, these are systems for a pre-existing setting (*actually Apocalypse World seems different I haven't read enough about it.)
    I guess my question is: has anyone done this in a commercial product? I know we here at SG don't require print publishing to be a "real" product...BUT if we're just looking at web projects then this has been going on since the earliest days of the internet. Someone likes setting X, dislikes the associated system and hacks System Y to work with it.

    I guess my problem with it is that really what it means is "requires setting mastery of a pre-existing setting that I am not going to write about here." I'm more interested in games that take setting X, boils it down to a few parts and makes a dedicated system. Perhaps that's just my bias against huge settings.
  • Oh, agreed - I share your problem with settings.
    I would probably run Radiant with nothing from the original game but my memory and a big ol' list of Charms (which I could find on los internets, by the way).

    I have to admit, I'm less interested in "mere" setting-hacks shoehorning a given system onto something else - - I'm intrigued by playtested, polished, finished systems that require another, specific setting book to use. Though I have to admit the Murderland example has got me wracking my brain for a board game I'd wanted to convert to an RPG (and sadly, Hero Quest and Battle Masters are, effectively, already Warhammer FRP or Tabletop). Maybe I should try Go to the Head of the Class, or Trouble, instead.
    Augh, now I think I have to one-up Dance and the Dawn by devising an RPG from the game components of Parcheesi.
  • Would Dread and Jenga fit in this discussion?
  • I think they would. I haven't played Dread, but yeah, it sure sounds appropriate.
  • I posted last week about an idea I'm thinking of that involves playing Ninja Burger with the InSpectres rules, and I envision it basically being a list of 'tweaks' to InSpectres and saying "read the Honorable Employee's Handbook, the Ninja Burger RPG, or the Ninja Burger Card Game at a minimum". I don't want to tread on any of the creator's toes, though, by being too explicit in my hack.
  • What could be problematic about your hack, Jeff?
    Granted, I need to check out Ninja Burger for a better context for such things, yeah. But there's a few games out there now that pretty directly rely on using copyrighted materials. That may be a product of relative obscurity, as Parke suggested, but, well, nevertheless...
  • Realm Guard requires Mouse Guard to play.
  • James Wallis's somehow never yet published parody game Frup seems relevant, here. It is a fantasy world where the D&D Player's Handbook and DMG fell out of the sky one day. The inhabitants thereof took these books to be holy books, and have built their entire culture around the weird idiosyncrasies of Dungeons and Dragons.

    Never actually published, though, despite the best effort of a superteam of RPG writers.
  • Posted By: Zac in DavisWhat could be problematic about your hack, Jeff?
    Granted, I need to check out Ninja Burger for a better context for such things, yeah. But there's a few games out there now that pretty directly rely on using copyrighted materials. That may be a product of relative obscurity, as Parke suggested, but, well, nevertheless...
    Oh, no real big problems, it's more just that both are indie games and I don't want to rip anything off from some guys who made something they thought was cool. I don't *imagine* they'd have a problem if I made something available for free on the internet that said "buy their book, then use this other guys book plus these changes to run a game", but it's also kind of mean.

    But yeah, this whole trend excites me overall, as recently it seems to pay a lot more attention to a) finding a rule system that matches the premise, rather than just "my favorite/most familiar/most D&D" rules, and b) exploring how the mash up changes the game from either of its parents. Apocalypse D&D looks like it'd produce a game that isn't quite AW or AD&D, but with recognizable and fun flavor from both.

    So, I guess, ideally what I'm saying is that InjaSpectreburger wouldn't just be InSpectres all in black with swords or Ninja Burger with different rules, but a beautiful love child using the most compatible elements of both.

    Damn, now I'm actually going to have to put this together.
  • edited May 2010
    If I remember correctly, the original D&D boxed set required a copy of "Chainmail" as well as the game "Outdoor Survival", published by an entirely different company. This is not a new thing.
  • Posted By: Simon CIf I remember correctly, the original D&D boxed set required a copy of "Chainmail" as well as the game "Outdoor Survival", published by an entirely different company. This is not a new thing.
    It didn't require them, it just described how they optionally could be used with it.
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