[Game Chef 2010] Which entries are you excited about?

edited September 2010 in Story Games
Hey, everybody!
I subscribed to the submissions page for Game Chef, and I've been poring over the mountain(!) of e-mailed entries that came through last night and today. I gotta say, some of them really jump out at me as exciting... What are you jazzed about?

My list would have:
- Red Land Black Land, Jason Godesky (I'm a sucker for anything with the phrase "Scorpion King" in the text)
- Walkabout, Michael Wenman (aboriginal myths, bad-ass aboriginal art in the booklet. Exciting!)
- Walkers in the Witchery Way, Alla Hoffman (skinwalkers! in a game! how cool is that??)
- Deserting Paradise, Joe Mcdaldno (magic, immortal teenagers are the draw; slick mechanics keep me interested)
- Maddenhaffen, Renee Knipe (an interesting spin on very Warhammer-inspired material. Also, rat-people ^_^)

Comments

  • I'm most excited by Alex Fradera's A Journey, which is about Tony Blair. I'm intrigued by the postapocalyptic ones (Edge of Annihilation, After The Fall and Last Chance, USA).

    I always like concept-driven games, so I'm interested in A City and especially Memoir. If they're good, they'll be very very good.

    I'm also interested in Sojourn and A Trick of the Light, just because the descriptions sound fun.
  • Posted By: GrahamAlex Fradera's A Journey, which is about Tony Blair
    !

    Color me the color of excitement.
  • I'm also really looking forward to Alex Fradera's A Journey. It’s a real shame its the only game which currently doesn't have a link to it. I’m sure 1kt1km will get around to it soon.
    Posted By: Graham
    I always like concept-driven games, so I'm interested in A City and especially Memoir. If they're good, they'll be very very good.
    Thanks Graham. I hope Memoir doesn't disappoint. I would have liked to have given it a playtest with my regular group, but because I was overseas I ended up testing with two people who’d never played a story-game before in their lives (and therefore had no frame of reference with which to suggest changes or compare) and myself (who knew the game so well I’d never have spotted some issues if they’d hit me with a cricket bat). It will get its full play-test and polish at some point. Right at the moment though, I need some distance from it.
  • Man-of-Letters, Man-of-War
    Haven't read a lick of this one yet, but followed the thread where it was being hashed out. Fight nautical battles. Write letters home. Sea shanties. What's not to love?

    Red Land, Black Land
    One of the games to emerge from Team Fremen, Jason's game of journeying to escape the reach of the Scorpion King is super hot stuff.
  • I hate to counsel against my own game, but I really had the clock against me when I submitted, and looking over it it's very gappy. As it stands I can't vouch for its playability.

    I'm excited by the idea of developing it, and I think the read can be illuminating; there is stuff drawn out of my experiences with long-form improv and a long-standing wish to design player roles that are totally different in terms of how they intersect with the game.

    I'm personally really interested in reading
    The Hand of Gulliver the Man-Mountain by Mike Pohjola
    Memoir by Declan Feeney
  • My game is really rushed, sloppy and I feel like I let the concept down.

    I'm excited about Walkabout, Man-of-Letters Man-of-war, Edge City, Danger Mountain! and others that elude me right now. I'll be checking them all out when I can.
  • I was super impressed to see the breadth and depth of entries this year. When I heard the ingredients, I thought we'd see a lot of very similar games, but as always gamer ingenuity has teased out a lot of fascinating subjects and approaches. I've only read my own and Double King's so far, but I'm hoping to explore them all. It's great to see guys like Mike Pohjola entering Game Chef, too!
  • I support Jason's comments. When I started thinking about the elements and how to put them together, I couldn't really imagine any other way to put them together besides something similar to what I was doing. Which, I guess, kind of makes sense, because...that's how I put them together...and I'm not terribly imaginative. But looking at some of the things that people did with these ideas is fascinating. Stuff I never would've thought of, and that always gets me pumped.

    Based purely off of the blurbs on the submissions page, the ones that caught my eye were A Trick of the Light, The Hand of Gulliver the Man Mountain, Chronicles of Skin, Burial at Crossroads, Walkabout, After the Fall, Fall of Granada, A Sojourn in Alexandria, Deserting Paradise, Maddenhafen, Man-of Letters Man-of-Wars, Sparks from the Fire, and Omphalos. As has been echoed many times, however, I certainly plan to try to read as many of them as I can greedily gobble with my eye holes.

    As a first time Game Chef, both in terms of making a game and actually being around for when all the games were completed and brand spanking new, I am totally pumped. Really looking forward to reading these things.
  • Posted By: Saint Erebus When I started thinking about the elements and how to put them together, I couldn't really imagine any other way to put them together besides something similar to what I was doing. Which, I guess, kind of makes sense, because...that's how I put them together...
    Brendan, I love this. You saw what was obvious to you, and you built a game around it. (And mobile, devouring cities? Cool!)

    I did the same - Tony Blair's A Journey was literally the first thing that popped into my mind when I saw the theme, and the rest fell straight from that obvious connection. No special acts of re-imagining, at least on my part. Just what my head spat out.

    I suspect it's the same for many submissions.

    I do believe each of us is a unique, couldn't-design-us-if-you-tried conduit for taking the various stuffs of life, mixing them up and spraying them into the world. Give us the same raw materials, and naturally, inevitably, obviously, we come to create things that are just ours.

    I love this!
  • I was astounded at the variety of different games, just based on the blurbs and the discussions on the Forge. The variety, from literal brawls between cities to retelling a war in sigils, it's a massive variety.

    I am particularly excited about Chronicles of Skin personally, but there are so many interesting ones out there. At least, more interesting then my game which was me getting Nicomachean ethics out of my head and onto a page.
  • Posted By: Alex FJust what my head spat out.
    Exactly what I did to; write the first thing in my mind, and stick with it. I wrote the blurb first, and made the game to suit it (that is; almost. Game testing yesterday seems to indicate I have to make two games; one serious and one humorous).
  • edited September 2010
    Man-of-Letters Man-of-war
    Silver and White

    those really grabbed me and make me want to give them a spin. The ideas of the former are cool and nifty, and the latter is just insanely compelling.
  • So I've been going through the list, reading games whose descriptions jump out at me. I haven't read too many yet, but so far I'm really liking Chronicles of Skin and The Hand of Gulliver the Man-Mountain, probably because I really like drawing on things.

    Seeing the wide variety of games that were produced, I could have wished I had come up with an interpretation of the ingredients that was a little less literal. I don't feel like I brought the innovation the way some of the games I've been reading did...
  • Anna, I'm in the same boat. My game sounds a lot like many others and thus stands out from the pack of 58 less. Submitting 53rd doesn't help either. That doesn't mean our games are any less awesome, though! I just hope Jonathan's brain doesn't melt before he can give each one a proper look.

    Blurbs I'm diggin':

    My God’s Bigger Than Your Godby Joe Prince
    World Riddle by Stuart Chaplin
    Symbolon by Kamion (confusing, but enticing)
    Sojourn: The City and The Desert by Brendan G. Conway
    Desert Journey by John Evans

    The games I tried to help with and thus learned more about all seem cool too. A Trick of the Light, Walkabout, Edge City, Omphalos, The Book of Sands, Danger Mountain! and Under the Sun.
  • The game I'm most intrigued by at this point is Maddenhafen by Renee Knipe. Looks like a traditional fantasy RPG, with many pages devoted to weapons and spells, but has a killer premise. You're part of a besieging army, going on group missions, but slowly learning things that humanize the enemy. Just read page 23.
  • edited September 2010
    Posted By: Jason MorningstarI was super impressed to see the breadth and depth of entries this year. When I heard the ingredients, I thought we'd see a lot of very similar games...
    That was my first impression as well. I'm nearly positive that the reason that didn't really happen is the inclusion of the ingredient "skin". Both "city" and "desert" immediately trigger a number of obvious notions for a game. "Edge" isn't quite as obvious, but ideas flowing from it are still pretty immediate. The initial reaction to skin is "how the fuck do I make a game about skin"?

    I think all such contests should have at least one ingredient like this. It's what turns fifty games called City on the Edge of the Desert into a creative orgy of oddness like S[k]in City: An Existential Journey of Vegas Strippers (a game I now wish I would have made, rather than the one I half-created).
  • Posted By: Wordman[k]in City: An Existential Journey of Vegas Strippers
    Now that's a game that has got me excited.
  • Posted By: WordmanI think all such contests should have at least one ingredient like this.
    Thanks, that was semi-intentional. At least as semi-intentional as it can be with randomly chosen elements off a list.
  • Posted By: GrahamI'm most excited by Alex Fradera's A Journey, which is about Tony Blair. I'm intrigued by the postapocalyptic ones (Edge of Annihilation, After The Fall and Last Chance, USA).

    I always like concept-driven games, so I'm interested in A City and especially Memoir. If they're good, they'll be very very good.

    I'm also interested in Sojourn and A Trick of the Light, just because the descriptions sound fun.
    Thank you Graham,

    A City didnt get as far along as I wanted it too. Life and all that. However it did help me develop more of the ideas of what I personally want in gaming, and also in my own fiction writing. So I would love any comments and feedback on it. Even the points that totally suck, it can only help.
    Again thanks
    Tad
  • All I've read so far is Jason's Red Land, Black Land, and I was really pleased with it.
  • I've been reading Brachininae. I'm quite excited by the character generation questions. Specifically, a player creates a significant person (or thing) in their character's life and the other players ask difficult questions like "what did you do when you found X having sex with y?" thereby creating a tragic, and unpredictable, character history. These histories are told as flashbacks as the characters execute a doomsday bombing run on a giant, tyrannic machine. In the foreground, essentially, we are taking a step through each character's life while, in the background, we are seeing how they sacrifice themselves for a greater cause. Intense.

    I also have a to-read list:

    Danger Mountain! (Just because Jason Morningstar wrote it—I'm a sheep for big names)
    Silver and White (again, Jackson Tegu... )
    Memoir (How will you be remembered? That hits a primal nerve.)
    Nowhere Road (I'm hooked by the line "You think you know what you want. But the other players know what you Really Need.")
    7SSR (Good story hook: stuck in an abandonded city in the middle of a desert with some brand new tattoos and a note addressed to them)
    The Hand of Gulliver the Man-Mountain ("The world’s first manual-digital-tactile roleplaying game.")
    Never to Die (It sounds vulgar and mean, which I'm sort of turned on by, but I also think there's a mundanity here that I'd like to express myself in a story game... that's probably a shit way of saying it. What I mean is that there is something common about this story, something gritty and opaque, that I don't often tell in my own game sessions. I'm looking forward to seeing what that feels like.)
    What Happened Here (Two player game: always interesting.)
    Walkabout (I liked the enthusiasm and the ozzie perspective during the development process. Because of that, this might be the game I play.)
    A City (Sounds vague and artsy.)
    A Sojourn in Alexandria (Jason Pitre looks like the kind of guy who probably knows his shizzle. If he does, then this'll be a good read, and maybe even a game that I'd like to get my friends to try. History sells!)
    Going Home: An Urban Power Fantasy ("Basically, “Falling Down”, the role playing game.")
    Sparks from the Fire (Again, this is a name thing. I saw Brennan Taylor post "I made a good game," or something to that effect, and I believed him.)
    Over the Wall (I'm interested in the idea of skin as currency.)
    Man-of-Letters, Man-of-Wars: A Game of Tactical Correspondence with a Chance of Drowning (This has the most exciting premise and the most delicious blurb. It already sounds like a complete game that I'd pay for. I can't wait for this one, so I've purposely left it at the bottom of my list, dangling there like a carrot.)
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