UK story-telling festival

edited September 2006 in Meetups / Conventions
Festival at the edge

Bit of blurb:

Festival at the Edge is a story telling festival. Stories to make you laugh, cry and wonder. FATE is a festival for everyone, as well as for those already bitten by the story bug.
From Friday to Sunday, there is always a choice of something on offer - the best international storytellers in performance, music, comedy, poetry and related arts. If you want to participate, there are workshops, story rounds and sessions. At night the bonfire sessions continue until late (or dawn!).
It amuses me that the acronym is FATE.

OK, so we've missed 2006. Anyone think it might be interesting to try and get a story-game presence in 07?

It's kind of a folk storytelling festival. Any good folk storygames? Anyone tempted to write one?

Comments

  • Any good folk storygames?
    Something like 1001 Nights, maybe?

    Graham
  • It'd be cool to have a presence with some "storygame workshops", showing people how everyone can get involved with telling stories and having fun!
  • It's a great idea to present storygames and/or roleplaying games on events for storytellers. You missed the 2006 FATE-festival, but in january it's the Winter's edge. Try to make a stand there.
  • By the way; from the text at the website it don't have to be folkstories or fairytales or anything traditional. It seems like the festival will more than welcome something brand new to the storytelling stage.
  • Graham: exactly what I was thinking.
    Tomas: cool, I didn't see they had the stuff for the next festival up.

    I was originally envisaging something fairly guerilla - a bunch of flyers stashed variously promising an interactive story game for ages x-y at this pub or around a bonfire over there. I would probably want to run it by organisers "Hi! We'll be your tiny symbiotes for the duration" but otherwise work fairly independently.

    But Andrew, Tomas, your contributions make me wonder. Is there a realistic way to get more visibility (or if you don't like that idea, giving more people a chance to have fun) by trying to get storygames to be a thing at the festival? Assuming we could get their interest, how would a workshop work, logistically?

    Any thoughts on guerilla tactics, hitting the storytelling mainstream, or general info on the Storytelling scene - welcome like a danish in my belly.
  • Posted By: Alex FraderaBut Andrew, Tomas, your contributions make me wonder. Is there a realistic way to get more visibility (or if you don't like that idea, giving more people a chance to have fun) by trying to get storygames to be a thing at the festival? Assuming we could get their interest, how would a workshop work, logistically?
    Easy, the workshop would just be a story game! You'd say "come, let us show you how to make up fun stories with your friends at our Story Games workshop" and you'd just teach them how to play a Story Game! It's running games for folks by a different name. You could even ditch any mention of the word game in case it put people off.
  • I think ideal games for this would be Pantheon and Baron Munchausen - both are very much designed in the context of "telling a story" as opposed to "playing a role", and require no more than a brief explanation of the rules before play begins - no fiddling around guiding people through character gen. (Indeed, they kind of qualify as the sort of "story rounds" they talk about in their blurb.)
  • edited September 2006
    I have a feeling that, if we were to go to this thing with the attitude that "We've got these great games to show them", they might just not care.

    If people went to the festival to find out about what made them tick, they might be more receptive to that.

    Graham
  • Graham, you're right, I think. I met up with my friend Tom who alerted me to FATE via his blog, and he reckons that at a folky festival like this "Storytelling" has a pretty specific meaning. Specific enough that it could be violated not just by introducing mechanics to the mix, but through ignorance of its form, content and ritual elements.

    Still, there might be something interesting there. I have to confess that the folk circuit per se doesn't commnad a vast amount of my interest, so I'm not sure whether I would put aside time to immerse myself in it for its own sake. That said, it does hold a kernel of interest for me, if only to see the boundaries and extent of the form.
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