[Ingenero] Good at scenario writing and want to get published? Submissions required

edited May 2011 in Story Games
Ingenero is a rpg system meant for action-themed games in the setting of your choice. The GM, or the GM and players collectively, can go through the setup process to produce a setting, characters, and initial situation before starting to play.

An intro to the system can be found on my website (along with the rules) here: Ingenero website

HOWEVER.

Setup can take a long time, and while some players love the creative process, some just wanna play right now.
Its also a fact that a generic system on its own is a hard sell. A compelling situation with great characters in an inspiring setting is what sells a game.

So that's I'm looking for - canned scenarios to include in the Ingenero rulebook to hook people in and showcase the system. Three to five canned scenarios seems about right. It will depend on how many high quality submissions I receive.

THE DEAL:

The game will be published via CreateSpace which is Amazon's Print On Demand service. I plan to sell it for around $10-$15 via print only. My intention is to split the profits 50% between canned scenario authors and myself. The final price of the book will depend on the number of scenarios included. I do not want each scenario to earn less than $1 per unit solid, so the price will increased based on that.

Ingenero is meant for improvised play, and allowing a lot of room for GM and player imagination to build the details of the setting. That means no plot or highly detailed setting is required. What exactly is then required for a canned scenario?
  • an inspiring setting -- one that hasn't already been done to death. Sketch the setting with a broad brush. Make it intriguing. Provide plenty of hooks for player to build on, but don't turn every stone. Leave space for the players to add their own stuff. You should be thinking more of emotive descriptions, hints and hooks, rather than facts.
  • great characters with interesting motivations, goals and histories. Interesting characters, not cliches.
  • A compelling premise and initial situation. Something that makes a players say "I wanna play that!" THIS IS MOST IMPORTANT.
    Great layout and artwork. The system part of the rulebook has no artwork. Your scenarios help SELL the book. They have to look the part. If you aren't a good artist yourself, better make use of one, somehow.
  • Not more than 10-20 pages, inclusive of character sheets.
  • You gotta play-test your scenario.
A good example of what the general type of thing required is this great game by John Harper : Lady Blackbird.

lady blackbird

This is very light on setting detail, you can do more than that. But remember, you are sketching the setting, mostly through a collection of emotive hooks that can be used during play, rather than describing it in detail.

The book itself will be color cover, interior black and white, and 8.5 x 11 inches, so theres your layout.
More details when they come will be provided at the Ingenero site: ingenero website

sincerely,

Steve Mathers (stefoid)

Comments

  • Sounds interesting. Are you expecting people to pitch them to you first?
  • WHATS THE PROCESS?

    Nothing too formal. Get in touch and we can consider what you want to do. Ill give a commitment to your submission early in the process before layout, artwork etc... a rough concept draft is fine for a commitment. I am considering devoting all profits to paying off the cost of artwork initially.
  • AUDIENCE:

    Any gamers who like action-themed games - combat, tactics, doing and being seen to do cool stuff with their characters. But who want to dial the emphasis away from complex cause and effect mechanics and concentrate more on well paced, satisfying fiction. Mainstream gamers looking for something a little different in other words, without having to sacrifice what they already like about role-playing to get it.
  • Nobody interested? Is there a specific problem with the proposal or is it just a case of meh?
  • I'm not so good with writing scenarios and such, but I'd be happy to help provide artwork if you're interested. Feel free to take a look over here to see if you like what I'm capable of.

    Plus, my rates at this stage in my career are VERY reasonable (read as: free).
  • Hell yes! I like the inked stuff especially.

    If someone interested just in scenario design wanted to partner up with you that would be great, otherwise I could do so myself.
  • edited May 2011
    Posted By: stefoidNobody interested? Is there a specific problem with the proposal or is it just a case of meh?
    Since you asked...

    I suspect you're getting a lot of silent mehs, partly because of the proposal.

    You're billing a "hey, want to get published?" to a group that values (and in some cases fetishizes) DIY publishing -- which is to say, they don't need someone else to publish. So, that's not a huge selling point. And you're overusing "required".

    Here are some ideas that might help your pitch in the future. (Or might not, who knows.)

    * Get up-front about why your game is awesome and why I should be excited. Understand the audience you're talking with -- this is not the same audience as ENWorld and it isn't the same audience as RPG.net (that there's overlap and meta-overlap is true, but is still to be considered).
    Posted By: stefoidIts also a fact that a generic system on its own is a hard sell.
    And you haven't sold the game by the time you've said this.

    * Your language should be tailored to your audience. In some places, a call for scenarios like this would get met by people eager to be in print. In other places, a more human "hey, I need help, and here's what I'm offering" will get more of a response. These are functionally the same, but engage very different people.

    * Format your post better. Edit if need-be. The formatting you've got there shows a lack of care that would turn me off as a potential contributor. "If dude isn't going to clean up his post, what's to say he'll do my work any justice."

    * Time your proposal better. Watch when the forum's most active. Tuesday late morning/early afternoon (Pacific or Eastern Time) is a good time for a social media push, and that likely holds true here as well.

    I'm sure you have some people interested and talking with you -- at least, I hope so. Just remember that people who say yes to these sorts of things will often flake on you, so if you're looking for three to five of these, you're looking for around ten to twenty people who will say yes. :)

    Good luck!

    - Ryan
  • edited May 2011
    Posted By: Ryan MacklinPosted By: stefoidNobody interested? Is there a specific problem with the proposal or is it just a case of meh?
    Since you asked...

    I suspect you're getting a lot of silent mehs, partly because of the proposal.

    You're billing a "hey, want to get published?" to a group that values (and in some cases fetishizes) DIY publishing -- which is to say, they don't need someone else to publish. So, that's not a huge selling point. And you're overusing "required".

    Good luck!

    - Ryan

    I know people on this forum are busy with their own projects, but I also know some people already do this kind of thing - designing characters in interesting situations as a prepackaged scenario and I thought I might get a fair amount of traction because of that.

    Thanks for your help.
  • edited May 2011
    Posted By: Ryan MacklinJust remember that people who say yes to these sorts of things will often flake on you, so if you're looking for three to five of these, you're looking for around ten to twenty people who will say yes. :)
    This is so true on so many levels for so many things in life. If I want 30 people to come to a party, I will invite at least 90 people. For our local gaming conventions, I have little problem soliciting 40 game submissions now because I've cultivated over time a list of 120+ local and trustworthy GMs.
  • I like the collaborative aspect of this proposal, but with people getting their own bit. It's kind of like getting a playset into Fiasco Companion, you are part of it but not carrying it so it still hits DIY for me. Given the smaller investment (20 pages) you need I think flaking out will be less of a problem.

    I think the biggest problem is, as you said, the generic nature of the game. I "sell" games to my players to play based on what you do first then how cool the system is second. For example "It's like hard core pirate action and the system is simple and fast". It took me a couple of looks through the draft to get how simply you had actually laid it out, how simple the rules really were and how it hit the "just play it now" you were aiming for.

    I know it doesn't really need a character sheet, but do you have one? That might be a way for people to see how it works quickly.
  • Posted By: WightbredI like the collaborative aspect of this proposal, but with people getting their own bit. It's kind of like getting a playset into Fiasco Companion, you are part of it but not carrying it so it still hits DIY for me. Given the smaller investment (20 pages) you need I think flaking out will be less of a problem.

    I think the biggest problem is, as you said, the generic nature of the game. I "sell" games to my players to play based on what you do first then how cool the system is second. For example "It's like hard core pirate action and the system is simple and fast". It took me a couple of looks through the draft to get how simply you had actually laid it out, how simple the rules really were and how it hit the "just play it now" you were aiming for.

    I know it doesn't really need a character sheet, but do you have one? That might be a way for people to see how it works quickly.
    I put a character sheet on the website - I havent figured out how to merge pdf files yet.

    So if it took a couple of looks, I need to work on a summary, dont I?
  • Posted By: WightbredGiven the smaller investment (20 pages) you need I think flaking out will be less of a problem.
    It is never less of a problem. :) People flake on 75-word bios and 750-word flash fiction entires.

    Life happens to people all the time when they make other plans.

    - Ryan
  • Posted By: Ryan Macklin
    It is never less of a problem. :) People flake on 75-word bios and 750-word flash fiction entries.
    Wow really? OK, I'm hearing you talk from experience here, so I'm convinced.
  • Posted By: stefoid
    I put a character sheet on the website - I havent figured out how to merge pdf files yet.

    So if it took a couple of looks, I need to work on a summary, dont I?
    The character sheet really helps with clarity, but even it makes it look more complicated than how I now understand the rules. The biggest problem when I looked through the first time was how many types of Motivations there were, and the character sheet really shows the connection between these.

    Yeah, I think you need a summary.
  • Ive done a draft of what Im looking for in terms of canned scenarios for Ingenero.

    Its called Black Sun. You can read it here:

    ingenero downloads page

    Feedback welcome and greatly appreciated.
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