Pitch Movie Ideas: Movies that make RPGs Look Good

edited June 2011 in Story Games
In "Stuff to Watch," in response to the movie The Wild Hunt, Johnstone fumes:
Posted By: JohnstoneDo we get the movie about the boffer larpers who stumble across the neo-nazi survivalist kidnappers and manage to save the day by taking the foam off their swords? Do we get the movie about a frustrated artist with a block who can't find the will to draw again until she finds gaming group to inspire her creativity? No, we get the normal dude has to save his girlfriend from the crazy larpers.
Albi_SG responds:
Posted By: Albi_SGDamn, such movies would be *so* cool. let's make it happen.
So, in this thread:
Pitch a movie that you could imagine being produced (in Hollywood or some other big budget arena), one that makes RPGs and their players look awesome.
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Comments

  • Dating & Dragons
    Genre: Romantic Comedy

    Rachel (played by Drew Barrymore) is a moderately successful writer, with a big case of writer's block. She's been unlucky in love recently, until she meets Jason (played by Tobey McGuire). Jason's a really awesome guy with a sexy vespa, but he's got his quirks: he drinks green tea in the morning instead of coffee, and he's a dungeonmaster. Rachel is hesitant at first, but agrees to give roleplaying a try. She loves it! And it gives her a story seed for her novel. At first the group is cool with this idea, but Rachel goes on to make millions from her awesome fantasy saga, all inspired by the adventures that take place at the gaming table. Tensions emerge. Will Jason & Rachel's love prevail? Will Rachel keep playing, even if the group demands that she not pen their adventures?
  • Well, it's nice to see something positive come out of my fuming and bile-spewing. I'll write a longer pitch for my first idea tomorrow.

    Can we workshop some of these ideas, too, Joe? I think it would be awesome if Dating & Dragons also gave a realistic portrayal of "a moderately successful writer." Rachel should sell a lot of books (what seems like a lot for most people, anyway), but still only make a reasonable living. Her gaming group thinks she's making a mint off them, and she has to convince them otherwise by providing them with actually realistic sales vs income numbers (provided by actual moderately successful writers). Also: what happens when her gaming group goes to a convention and they're recognized as the original players of the characters Rachel's fans have grown to love so much? Hijinks ensue.
  • Saving Throw
    Genre: Drama / Comedy

    Mitch Harvey, a columnist for a local newspaper, has been sober for 15 years before relapsing back into a day-long drunken stupor. After sullying up yet again his relationships with his boss, his supportive but tired ex-wife and his estranged teenage son, he stumbles into a D&D group which he initially mistakes for an AA support group. The group, moved by his story, accepts Mitch into their game, and later decides to help him get back his job, his family and control over his life. Can Mitch's D&D character, a Paladin fallen from grace, reclaim the favor of his deity? Can Mitch and his friends find the power to fight off his addiction? Can they use their skills as roleplayers to help him find a way back into his son's life? And when they do, will Mitch still consider them his friends?
  • Alon, that's a really great movie pitch. I would love to own that movie and force it upon friends.
  • Yeah, that's hard to beat.

    I want to see some really hot actors and actresses playing RPG's, and I want it to be anything but D&D, like ...

    The Fiasco Show

    Josie McDowell (played by Keira Knightley) just got fired from the set of Days of Our Lives and decides she needs to learn to act - and she finds an improv troupe (run by Brad Pitt) that does a Fiasco LARP, before an audience, that is rapidly growing in popularity. Will she be able to rise to the bar set by the other performers / players (including Gwyneth Paltrow and Mark Salling) - and when romance happens on the set will it threaten to bring the whole production down? The climax is a performance where the problems in their personal lives bleed into the play.
  • edited June 2011
    Princess Wushu
    Genre: Fantasy/Action/Comedy (with maybe a little Romance)
    In the style of The Princess Bride, we start with our normal Joe Dad on game night. Just as the D&D-esque game is getting ready, his little son and daughter come out in PJs and ask for a bedtime story. Instead of stopping the game, one of the players suggests Wushu (to break the D&D stereotype.) So, they improv a monkey king or similar ancient China or Japanese tale.

    Once upon a time... Like Peter Falk, the Dad would be the narrator voice in the story, the one connection between reality and the game story.

    After quick character introductions, when the players are speaking in game we see the scene as if its being filmed in the Orient. Down in the area where the subtitles would be, dice would appear as the characters perform their actions, each player have their own distinctive dice set. The dice almost act like a power bar or similar action/tension building mechanic ala Scott Pilgrim. As the movie progresses, the kids interrupt or veto actions ala the little boy in The Princess Bride. Later in the shared fiction, the kids fall asleep and the Dad moves to stop, but one of the players says we can't leave the story untold. So, they go back to finishing the story to get their happy ending before scooping up the kids.

    While you could certainly play with the stereotypes, one that might be fun to do is the the big hairy guy that plays the competent swordswoman (I always like Michelle Yeoh for those roles). I can see things like starting the characters in a tavern or sake house and having the kids complain but Dad saying, "It's tradition. Do you want a story or not?" :-)

    It's kind of rambly, but I think it would work. One of the fun things is that you make the real people very normal and the uber beautiful people are the Hollywood actors and actresses in the story.
    --
    TAZ
  • The Contingency Plan

    There's a semi-popular TV show called "The Contingency Plan". It's about a bunch of ex-cons and their parole officer who decide to clean up their neighborhood using their various "skills" through some not so legal means.

    An RPG of the show has been licensed and produced. The writer's room of the TV show just got the books sent to them. Most of writers (the main characters of the movie) used to play rpgs or something else similarly geeky (Magic, Larps, whatever). For the hell of it, they decide to play the game. At this point, their game starts to take all their creative juices, producing some amazing stories. The problem is, all the great stuff is happening in their game, and the stories and scripts for the show really start to suffer.

    That's the hook. The show is about to be cancelled, but some of the writers don't seem to be as bothered, as they are creating some great stories for "their game".

    Another set of actors (in the movie) will be playing the fictional characters in the show/game and the actors in the show. They have their own agenda and want to keep their paying acting jobs. Meanwhile, the characters in the RPG are starting to become self-aware. More problems.

    Yes, this is complicated, but I don't care. It would be an awesome movie. I'm going to need Charlie Kaufman's help with the script though. Maybe Paul Thomas Anderson can direct.
  • Seriously though, let's make Alon's movie.
  • Posted By: zircherthe the big hairy guy that plays the competent swordswoman (I always like Michelle Yeoh for those roles).
    Dood, Jack Black or Philip Seymour Hoffman brushing cheetohs crumbs off his big-ass beard with Michelle Yeoh as his PC would be brilliant!
  • (more in the cheezy action vein)

    Forest of Swords

    Alex Kelso desperately needs a break from her life, her job, and her disappointing relationship, so when her brother Robert invites her to a weekend-long boffer larp in the woods with him and his best friend Maxwell James, she thinks "why not, what could go wrong?"

    A few days of camping out and dressing up, riding horses, quaffing mead, and hitting each other with foam weapons seems like the very opposite of her too-serious life in the city, Alex soon realizes her brother Robert is driven by a fantasy quest of his own. The real reason he's moved back into their parent's basement and only works part time at the local bike repair shop is because he spends all his time in training. This is the weekend he intends to claim the title of East Coast Renaissance Swordfighting Champion from it's current holder, Lilian Wu!

    Alex is soon bewitched herself by Lilian, who seems to be equally at home behind the DM screen and the tavern bar as she is on the fencing grounds. But when our four heroes try lugging their ale barrels through the forest for the Saturday night party, they witness a horrible crime. A group of local neo-Nazi survivalists have captured the daughter of local politician George Hamlin, an outspoken opponent of camping larpers.

    Armed with their gaming-honed wits, the four attempt a rescue. When Alex and Maxwell accidentally blow up the kidnappers' meth lab, the fire spreads to their firearms stockpile, which also explodes. As the enraged skinheads circle round them with knives and machetes, Robert and Lilian stand back-to-back and draw their un-padded replica longswords...


    Actually, now that I think about it...
    1. After Alex accepts the invitation, Robert's girlfriend tells her she's worried about him, so Alex is already cued to his obsession with the championship title, and what he's decided to sacrifice to get it.
    2. They go drinking Saturday night and stumble across the kidnapping--but Maxwell gets kidnapped too, while Alex, Robert, and Lilian see only enough to follow the neo-Nazis back to their compound.
    3. Robert tells her this might be the annual event's last time, because this Hamlin dude is trying to get the park to shut it down. Alex thought he was too obsessed with his tough-on-crime bill to be worried about people dressing up, but he wants to clamp down on all kinds of fighting, even the fake kind.
  • Posted By: JohnstoneCan we workshop some of these ideas, too, Joe? I think it would be awesome if Dating & Dragons also gave a realistic portrayal of "a moderately successful writer." Rachel should sell a lot of books (what seems like a lot for most people, anyway), but still only make a reasonable living. Her gaming group thinks she's making a mint off them, and she has to convince them otherwise by providing them with actually realistic sales vs income numbers (provided by actual moderately successful writers). Also: what happens when her gaming group goes to a convention and they're recognized as the original players of the characters Rachel's fans have grown to love so much? Hijinks ensue.
    Yes, absolutely, we should workshop these. And then someone should write them.

    I'll happily write a screenplay for Dating & Dragons, if it looks like one of the better ideas. I've been wanting to write a sitcom or romantic comedy for a while, and Dating & Dragons totally fits the bill.
    This would actually work well as a sitcom, too.

    1. The episode where Rachel has her first date with Jason (coffee), followed shortly by her first D&D session with him.
    2. The episode where Rachel attempts (without success) to explain "writer's block" to the group of gamers who invent new stories every. single. week.
    ...
    5. The episode where Rachel first publishes one of the group's stories, but portrays Glondakk (Dwarven Fighter) as a doofus, and Laird is pissed off about that.
    ...
    9. The episode where they all go to a convention.

    I think that Rachel should be living just below poverty line, before she starts writing the fantasy series.
    I think that her success with the fantasy series should put her on bestseller lists (and thus, a comfortable income).
    The group thinks she's making millions off their creative genius, but in reality, she's just hit comfortably middle class.
  • edited June 2011
    Also, Saving Throw is absolutely the best idea so far.

    Who could play Mitch? I'm imagining some quirky indie darling, who can run the gamut from angry deadbeat to charming hip guy.

    Adrien Brody, Ryan Gosling, Mark Ruffalo.
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

    Rachel could be a genre e-book writer. That way you can have a faster turnaround time for "publishing" to rolling in money, and you can avoid having to have scenes with meeting with publishers, lawyers, and all that "realistic" stuff necessary to make Rachel be a successfully best selling author.
  • James Franco, but maybe I'm poisoned by that episode of Freaks & Geeks.
  • Posted By: lin_fusanRachel could be a genre e-book writer.
    I was imagining her being a general fiction writer, prior to joining Jason's D&D group.
    That way, there's another angle to cause hilarious tensions with: Rachel's snobby elitist writing buddies sneer at her D&D playing and fantasy writing.
    But she is making more money, AND she's having more fun.

    E-Book/Independent Publishing is a good angle, though.
    There'd be way too much gloss and fast-forwarding required to make the traditional publishing angle plausible.
  • For the mercenary inclined, actually publish some short stories during the series run under the character's name and sell them. :-)
    --
    TAZ
  • edited June 2011
    Posted By: elkinSaving Throw
    The group, moved by his story, accepts Mitch into their game,
    I love the scene where Mitch stands up in the D&D group and does his full "I'm Mitch and I'm an alcoholic" speech to the appreciative applause of the gamers.
  • Posted By: tony dowlerPosted By: elkinSaving Throw
    The group, moved by his story, accepts Mitch into their game,
    I love the scene where Mitch stands up in the D&D group and does his full "I'm Mitch and I'm an alcoholic" speech to the appreciative applause of the gamers.

    Actually, i prefere the scene where they do it again, at the end of the movie, and every other guy in the gaming group shouts out his own problems. It really stresses how they've been really helping each other, while helping mitch.

    Because Such a scene DOES happen, doesn't it?
  • Posted By: Albi_SGBecause Such a scene DOES happen, doesn't it?
    If I recall correctly, it's not a big "Dead Poets Society"-esque "Oh Captain, My Captain" moment... but it's there, in its own little way.

    Jake and Marty and Seline each have their revelatory self-help moments, and they realize that their sympathy wasn't a "character" that they donned, it was the real them.
  • Posted By: McdaldnoPosted By: Albi_SGBecause Such a scene DOES happen, doesn't it?
    If I recall correctly, it's not a big "Dead Poets Society"-esque "Oh Captain, My Captain" moment... but it's there, in its own little way.

    Jake and Marty and Seline each have their revelatory self-help moments, and they realize that their sympathy wasn't a "character" that they donned, it was the real them.

    ...that's seriously wonderful.
  • edited June 2011
    Posted By: jdfristrom
    The Fiasco Show

    Josie McDowell (played by Keira Knightley) .... an improv troupe (run by Brad Pitt)
    In any movie like this, the main characters should be played by not-so-good-looking actors, but any time the fiction of the game comes into play, the "shared imagined space" and actions within it is visualized for the viewer using beautiful-people actors and a more stylized visual style. And, you know, Vin Diesel.
  • Posted By: WordmanPosted By: jdfristrom
    The Fiasco Show

    Josie McDowell (played by Keira Knightley) .... an improv troupe (run by Brad Pitt)
    In any movie like this, the main characters should be played by not-so-good-looking actors, but any time the fiction of the game comes into play, the "shared imagined space" and actions within it is visualized for the viewer using beautiful-people actors and a more stylized visual style. And, you know, Vin Diesel.

    No no ... We're making rpg's look awesome here. So we show hot people, alphas, opinion-leaders, playing them. For their own sake. Not to pretend to be hot. (Which doesn't seem that awesome to me.)
    Plus we're trying to fight back against the negative press. And that's one of the negative stereotypes. That only not-so-good-looking people play these games. And hey, some of y'all are hot, I'd get brad Pitt to play the movie version of you.
  • Posted By: jdfristromAnd hey, some of y'all are hot, I'd get brad Pitt to play the movie version of you.
    Tim C. Koppang is such a dreamboat.
  • Posted By: jdfristrom
    No no ... We're making rpg's look awesome here. So we show hot people, alphas, opinion-leaders, playing them. For their own sake. Not to pretend to be hot. (Which doesn't seem that awesome to me.)
    Plus we're trying to fight back against the negative press. And that's one of the negative stereotypes. That only not-so-good-looking people play these games. And hey, some of y'all are hot, I'd get brad Pitt to play the movie version of you.
    In my opinion, the general public isn't going to buy that vision. There's already a strong image of the D&D geek imbedded in the collective mind. You need to address the problem.. and then attack it.

    In the movie's first act.. many of the characters are "Hollywood Ugly." You can see imperfections in their faces.. Kiera Knightly is flatchested (well, she is!) Their clothing is careless, In their adventures, their looks are overly idealized. The fat guy in the group has bulging muscles. Kiera Knightly has D cups.

    As the movie progresses, their friendship deepens and they become more social. They begin to pay better attention to their appearance and show more confidance in real life. The appearance of their characters become more realistic as their outer and inner lives match up.
  • edited June 2011
    One of my "when I win the lottery" projects has been to actually make this.

    My "official" pitch would probably be Out of the Dungeon. Originally pitched as a PTA game...

    25 years ago [when I originally wrote this], in 1980, eight kids in your town disappeared. It was a fairly high profile disappearance, linked with Dungeons and Dragons, and played right into the hysteria going around at the time. The kids were involved in a D&D game; one of them was the dungeon master. The press, of course, ate it up. No bodies were ever found, and eventually it was forgotten, at least by everyone not friends and family of the kids.

    You don't know any of those kids or their friends or families.

    What you (the protagonists) don't know is this: those kids disappeared into the world of their roleplaying game.

    Nothing happens in a vacuum. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction, especially in a mystical sense. In order for those kids to disappear to another world, something had to come from that world to replace them.

    That would be their player characters.

    The protagonists' parents.

    What you (the protagonists) do know is that your parents seem to have been immigrants from somewhere (depending on who asks, sometimes it's Poland, sometimes it's Hungary, though your names are neither Hungarian nor Polish). They never talk about the old country where you can hear, though you all know there's something dodgy about the whole deal, like maybe they were in the country illegally. You've all been part of a fairly close-knit community with your friends, and (possibly) it's never struck you as funny that one of your friends has pointy ears. Your choice how much you know about American culture -- certainly you probably went to public schools, watched TV growing up, and the like, and probably one or more of your parents learned how to drive, got a job somewhere, etc. It's possible and even likely there are more of you than just you -- eight people came to this side, and while it's possible they all married one another, it's also possible that some of them married outside the group (or otherwise had kids outside).
    OotD: The Movie would probably be about the protagonists' parents.
  • edited June 2011
    can we just give this thread as a creative commons gift to Christopher Kubasik?
    Posted By: Mcdaldno
    Who could play Mitch? I'm imagining some quirky indie darling, who can run the gamut from angry deadbeat to charming hip guy.
    Jason Schwartzmann?
  • You guys know that you're awesome, right?
    I really think we're creating something here, a positive archetype for a roleplayer character. Just like movie lawyers can be either money-grubbing weasels or idealistic courtroom warriors, so can movie roleplayers be either a cultish circle of freaks with poor social skills, or a bunch of creative and supportive friends.
    Posted By: McdaldnoPosted By: Albi_SGBecause Such a scene DOES happen, doesn't it?
    ...
    Jake and Marty and Seline each have their revelatory self-help moments, and they realize that their sympathy wasn't a "character" that they donned, it was the real them.

    One of my favorite scenes, the one that's voice over'd in one of the trailers, is when Seline explains to Mitch what a saving throw is. Because, you know, the game is how most of us want to live our lives: we go out into the world, and we do stuff to change it. Sometimes we succeed, sometimes we fail. That's why we roll the dice most of the time, and it's called a skill roll: Can you climb that steep wall into the dark tower? Can you stop the dark ritual before it's too late? Can you sneak past the sleeping dragon without waking him up? that's up to you and your skills.

    But saving throws are a whole different thing. Sometimes, life just throws things your way, and it's not about succeeding or failing, it's just about surviving whatever bad things are in store for you. Do you survive the long fall down the window of the dark tower? Can you remain standing after the Manticore trips you with its tail? Can you control yourself when the demon whispers a command into your ear? That's what a saving throw is for.

    So, to recap, Gullivan's been struck with the goblin's arrow, and now there's poison cruising down your veins. Can you press on, or do you collapse helplessly on the cold, hard ground?
  • Posted By: Keith Sears
    In my opinion, the general public isn't going to buy that vision. There's already a strong image of the D&D geek imbedded in the collective mind. You need to address the problem.. and then attack it.
    This is unnecessarily calcified thinking.
    The general public will buy any vision sold with integrity.

    Also:
    Sexy people do play roleplaying games. Hot men and hot women do play roleplaying games. Fact.
  • The Matrix made computer hackers into sexy gothic fetish-wear kung fu warriors.
  • Posted By: McdaldnoPosted By: Keith Sears
    In my opinion, the general public isn't going to buy that vision. There's already a strong image of the D&D geek imbedded in the collective mind. You need to address the problem.. and then attack it.
    This is unnecessarily calcified thinking.
    The general public will buy any vision sold with integrity.

    Also:
    Sexy peopledoplay roleplaying games. Hot men and hot women do play roleplaying games. Fact.

    Yup.
  • XXXXtreme Street Luge

    Genre: Comedy/Action/Romance

    It would be like Clerks but for extreme street luge, toss in a cameo with Vin Diesel at the end where he breaks the fourth wall and reveals that the whole movie was a role playing game session at a gaming convention (or that he was playing the 'winning' character at the end of the game.)
    --
    TAZ
  • Posted By: McdaldnoSexy peopledoplay roleplaying games. Hot men and hot women do play roleplaying games. Fact.
    I'm in the "hot, but balding" category.
  • Posted By: jessecoombsPosted By: McdaldnoPosted By: Keith Sears
    In my opinion, the general public isn't going to buy that vision. There's already a strong image of the D&D geek imbedded in the collective mind. You need to address the problem.. and then attack it.
    This is unnecessarily calcified thinking.
    The general public will buy any vision sold with integrity.

    Also:
    Sexy peopledoplay roleplaying games. Hot men and hot women do play roleplaying games. Fact.

    Yup.

    I really think you boys are way too much in love with your own ideas.

    No actual discussion. Just shut me down. Perhaps I didn't make my position clear enough. Let's turn this into a Real discussion.

    First of all.. when I said that the characters should be "Hollywood Ugly," I did not mean that they should be stereotypical geeks and nerds. "Hollywood Uglies" are actually attractive people that could use a makeover. You know the girl in the teen romantic comedies where the girl just takes off her glasses and gets a new hairdo and she's suddenly a hottie? That's what I'm talking about.

    Do attractive people roleplay? Of course they do. Is this the norm? Really attractive people aren't actually "normal" to begin with.

    So, to have the integrity that you are looking for, the characters begin as fairly ordinary looking people. They should be likeable. Maybe one or two of them may turn some heads, but wouldn't have the impact of a supermodel in full makeup. The main characters would have a personal problem. Even models can have a lack of confidence when it comes to dealing with other people.

    The general movie plot is about personal transformation. Movies are a visual medium, so it is most effective to show the changes the characters undergo through their appearance, both in the the real world and in the inner world that they create together.

    Thoughts?
  • Mcdaldno's and elkin's movie pitches appear to be more about the transformation of the main character, the outsider, the non-gamer. The gamers provide the vehicle for the personal transformation, but don't necessarily transform themselves.

    If I have read their pitches correctly, this was intentional. The gamers don't have interior issues, aren't "flawed" in that sense, and are technically "perfect", thus providing the main protagonist the means to become a better person. That's one way to provide a "positive" image of the RPGer.

    I see a second method in Keith's suggestions. Start off with flawed characters with their physical imperfections as RPGers. They bond and/or grow using gaming as a medium. They come out at the end of the movie better, showing that RPGs/the activity can provide a medium of growth.

    The third method would be to have gaming be simply a tertiary thing that the characters do, like any other hobby, like playing poker on a night without the kids, so much so that it becomes background and something that people do, and not something that's a "big deal".

    Or that's how I see this exercise.
  • Posted By: Brennen ReeceI'm in the "hot, but balding" category.
    This had me laughing because at first I thought you were replying to the XXXXtreme comment. In that game, everyone selects attributes of Vin Diesel such as his hair (or the lack of it.)
    --
    TAZ
  • edited June 2011
    Steal from stories about writing and stories!

    THE DARK HALF: The group "retires" their modern occult horror game, only to discover that the characters themselves aren't so easy to dismiss.

    THE SHINING: A gamer tries to save his dysfunctional and failing gaming group (many of whom are also looking for work, because, well, the economy) by inviting them to house-sit a hotel with him, figuring having an entire winter with nothing to do but game will help. Things go poorly.

    THE NEVERENDING STORY: A group of young kids, while hiding from some bullies, find a crusty old book that opens a doorway to a land of magic and adventure that needs their imagination and creativity to survive!

    THE PRINCESS BRIDE: A funny, character-driven fantasy adventure that uses a "frame story" of a group of gamers rather than a grandpa narrating to his grandson. "I thought you didn't want to play kissing scenes." "I guess one would be okay."

    Actually I really dig the Dark Half-inspired idea. You've got the rising tension as the members of the group starts to suspect eachother as being behind the threatening phone calls and, eventually, murders, and the police get involved when they discover the "actual play" threads that describe yet predate the crimes, and then they discover that there's actual creepy psychic supernatural shit going on. Yeah. I'd watch the hell out of that.
  • There's a good Icelandic movie out there called Astropia. I highly recommend it. Very positive about roleplaying.
  • Posted By: lin_fusanThe third method would be to have gaming be simply a tertiary thing that the characters do, like any other hobby, like playing poker on a night without the kids, so much so that it becomes background and something that people do, and not something that's a "big deal".
    I think this is closest to the reality of it. Trying to push an overly positive image of roleplaying where everyone is perfect would probably bother me just as much as the negative stereotypes. I think the characters should have problems just like normal people do, but not stemming from gaming in anyway. Gaming would be a positive social outlet in their lives.

    I've written a full length screenplay before, which did nothing but sit on my hard drive, but if anyone wanted to write a screenplay with me I'd be interested.

    Also I keep thinking of the interview I saw where Vin Diesel talked about how he likes playing D&D.
  • edited July 2011
    Posted By: BenhimselfTHE NEVERENDING STORY: A group of young kids, while hiding from some bullies, find a crusty old book that opens a doorway to a land of magic and adventure that needs their imagination and creativity to survive!
    I could see this being the next Jumanji.
  • Trailer for Astropia. It's a work of genius!
  • okay, Astropia looks wonderful
  • Posted By: graypawnokay, Astropia lookswonderful
    I picked it up through netflix after seeing it referenced here a couple times. It's actually a pretty charming light comedy.
  • And now...this...
  • Posted By: McdaldnoAlso,Saving Throwis absolutely the best idea so far.

    Who could play Mitch? I'm imagining some quirky indie darling, who can run the gamut from angry deadbeat to charming hip guy.

    Adrien Brody, Ryan Gosling, Mark Ruffalo.
    For some reason, Bryan Cranston immediately came to mind for me.
  • edited July 2011
    Posted By: graypawnAnd now...this...
    I'm genuinely excited about this movie.
    The casting is beautiful. What's that? Jason Stackhouse and River Tam are in a larp with one of television's only Dungeon Masters?
    I am rarely overcome with nerd-glee. But this. This is glee worthy.
  • I'm getting a little glee!
  • Knights of Badassdom was done with a pretty considerable amount of input from real larpers, too.

    My friends Rick and Adrienne (aka the LARP Alliance) were on site at the filming, providing weapon props and lots of "what is it really like" answers.

    And apparently, they were mentioned quite heavily during the panel at ComiCon.

    So I think it will be a pretty awesome portrayal of larping. Even moreso than Role Models, which was pretty impressively positive, given the slapstick genre it was in.
  • Wow. Even I think that one looks okay. The "no pentagrams, this is a LARP" comment is a nice touch, actually.
  • Just watched Astropia with Amneziak and his wife. I LOVED IT. So good.

    The beginning is a bit slow, but the ending makes up for is so very thoroughly. It's...just watch it. It's good.
  • edited August 2011
    Posted By: McdaldnoAlso,Saving Throwis absolutely the best idea so far.

    Who could play Mitch? I'm imagining some quirky indie darling, who can run the gamut from angry deadbeat to charming hip guy.

    Adrien Brody, Ryan Gosling, Mark Ruffalo.
    Sam Rockwell would be my pick.
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