Group Experience Points

edited June 2011 in Story Games
So, I'm reading Storming the Wizard's Tower and realize there is both individual character advancement and also advancement as a group. Meaning, the whole party needs a certain amount of XP or whatever to reach the next "level".

I really dig this.

What other games take this approach that I can look at?

Comments

  • Hunter: The Vigil has "practical XP" that is meant to be spent as a group on special monster huntin'moves that the group has developed or practiced.

    Blood and Honor has an honor pool for the entirety of the honor of the player-character samurai clan. That means one guy can constantly be working to undo the terrible honor-destroying actions of another. Pretty great.
  • The most recent version of Warhammer FRP has some stuff like this. There are basically "classes" for different types of groups. Ragtag bunch of kids, gang of hardened criminals, religious sect, knightly order, that sort of thing, each with their own card. You can give one of your special abilities to the group, and everyone has access to it. The group didn't level up that I remember, but each group had a different way of getting points. I think they ended up resulting in an in group blowout and some mental damage, rather than being growth though. Might have given you a few Fate points. We only played one session, but it seemed like a neat system.

    Shadowrun and Earthdawn also had Group Karma and Group Threads, which are in the same vein, but the XP are still kind of filtered through the characters.
  • Well there are the Company rules in Reign. Many of Clash Bowley's games incorporate some sort of association in the character development phase and assigns a mechanical value to it (like a freighter ship in StarCluster3 or a society of spies in On Her Majesty's Arcane service) that can evolve and grow during the campaign. The characters can advance separately from the association and vice versa.
  • Posted By: walkerpWell there are the Company rules in Reign. Many of Clash Bowley's games incorporate some sort of association in the character development phase and assigns a mechanical value to it (like a freighter ship in StarCluster3 or a society of spies in On Her Majesty's Arcane service) that can evolve and grow during the campaign. The characters can advance separately from the association and vice versa.
    Walker beats me to the punch.

    In the same tone as these: A lot of older games included group resources that were almost to the tune of "the unplayed character".

    Got starship rules?
  • In a game I was fiddling with, there was a pool of XP equal to all the XP gained by the players. I called it "GM XP", and the GM could spend it to increase the scope and variety of new "fronts" and "threats" (That's the best name for them, even though I wrote this before I read AW).
  • Nice. Thanks for the suggestions!
  • I think MADCorp does something like this with a group XP that is spent to recruit new members for the group.
  • I'm going to steal this idea for GUMSHOE Fantasy. I have Team Tokens which can be used by anyone as long as there are no objections. They refresh when the team meets a mission way point. Group XP would be a fun way of building the number of tokens available. Players could donate some of their build points at an exchange rate to the team pot, or keep more for themselves.
  • One of the Feng Shui supplements - Friends of the Dragon - allowed the group to purchase schticks with XP donated by characters. It seemed kinda neat.
  • I wish I had time to write up the way this is handled in Ars Magica in a way that does it justice. Management of a shared fictional resource - the chantry - using group metagame resources is a major focus of the game, and it's rewarding enough that the even the stories of the PC wizards can take a backseat to it sometimes. The best thing to do would be to just download, for free, the fourth edition rulebook, and marvel and perhaps despair.
  • Old School Hack does a thing where everyone levels up after all players have each spent a certain number of Awesome Tokens.
  • There's honor in in Blood & Honor. This works in a similar manner but has greater impact when someone acts without honor. When someone is honorable they gain an honor point for the group. When they are dishonorable they cause the group to lose three honor points. The intent is to more accurately portray the theme of Japanese honor. It's one of those games I haven't played yet but really want to give a go. I'm curious how this mechanic works at the table.

    Victor
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