Marvel Heroic RPG - Rules Questions...

edited March 2012 in Story Games
Put your rules questions here.

Hopefully someone has the answers!
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  • edited March 2012
    When the Watcher rolls an Opportunity (a 1 on any of their dice):

    - Do you have to buy it immediately?
    - Can anyone else buy it?
  • I have all the answers! But then we're also assembling a FAQ, too. Which is going to be helpful.

    RE: Opportunities. If you don't buy it, and nobody else in the same scene does, it's gone. You can buy it and use it for a push or stunt upgrade, and save that until your next action, but that die with the 1 on it isn't going to sit there for long.
  • I'm not sure I understand this paragraph:
    As a player, you always have the option to spend 1 XP to add a Plot Point to your current pool of PP. This also increases the minimum PP you start each session with by +1 to a maximum of 5 PP (with 4 XP spent). It’s not the most efficient use of your XP, but maybe you really want to get ahead of the game! This increased minimum starting amount resets to 1 at the beginning of a new Act, though—make use of ‘em while you’ve got ‘em.
    Is this saying:
    - I can convert 1 XP to 1 PP?
    - Can I do this anytime? (I suspect only during a Transition scene) As often as I want? No limit?

    Additionally, this says this increases the minimum PP you start each session with by +1 to a maximum of 5 PP. Does that mean:
    - I'm only allowed to spend 4XP at the beginning of an Act this way?
    - But if I can convert XP to PP anytime (or during certain scenes), does it matter?
  • Can I roll:
    - both my opponents Complication AND one of their Stress?
    - or only one Complication OR one Stress?
  • If I spend a Plot Point to make an Asset last for the entire scene (rather than the next roll), does that mean:
    - We can roll it multiple times in a scene?
    - Can we roll it multiple times in the same Action Order?
  • Posted By: jenskotCan I roll:
    - both my opponents Complication AND one of their Stress?
    - or only one Complication OR one Stress?
    I'm really surprised that there's no answer yet.

    According to a post by Cam that I can't possibly find, it's one or the other (barring PP expenditure, I suppose).
    Confirmed in the sidebar on OM47, and it's somewhere in the text, too, but I can't find it.
  • Thanks Jason!

    OM47 says:
    TRAITS YOU CAN ADD TO YOUR DICE POOL:
    - One Affiliation die
    - One Distinction, either as a d8 or a d4
    - One power from each of your Power Sets
    - One Specialty
    - One of your opposition’s stress or complication dice, if any
    - One asset, if any
    - One push die, stunt, or resource, if any
    Does that then also mean you can't use both a push and a stunt at the same time?

    Followup question, why would you choose to give someone a Complication instead of Stress?

    I can see why you would want to do both if you could use both at the same time, but now that you can't, I'm not sure. They give you the same benefit in an Action Scene but Stress stays around where Complications go away (unless you pay a Plot Point to make the Complication last longer).

    The same applies to push and stunt dice. If I can't use them at the same time, why would I ever use a push die?

    We've played 5 times now, every time with new players (many who have read the Operations Manuel) and these questions have been coming up quite a bit. I'm trying to create an advanced Cheat Sheet but I don't feel I have all the details nailed down yet. And we may be introducing the game to 20-50+ new people this weekend!
  • Posted By: jenskot
    Is this saying:
    - I can convert 1 XP to 1 PP?
    - Can I do this anytime? (I suspect only during a Transition scene) As often as I want? No limit?

    Additionally, this says this increases the minimum PP you start each session with by +1 to a maximum of 5 PP. Does that mean:
    - I'm only allowed to spend 4XP at the beginning of an Act this way?
    - But if I can convert XP to PP anytime (or during certain scenes), does it matter?
    I'll take a stab...

    According to OM109, you can only spend XP during a Transition Scene. So, let's assume that is the case here.

    Spending XP this way does two things:

    1. You get 1 PP in exchange for each 1 XP spent;
    2. You increase your session-starting PP by 1 PP for each 1 XP spent, to a maximum of +4 PP increase; this "upgrade" disappears at the beginning of the next Act.

    So, you can buy as many PP as you want, but only the first 4 XP spent increase your session-starting PP pool.
  • Say I buy 4PP with 4XP.

    Would that actually mean I've bought 8PP with 4PP?

    I get 4PP now AND 4 more at the start of the next Act?

    Or does this mean that I get to keep 4 more at the start of the next Act, assuming I have any left to keep?
  • Posted By: jenskot
    Does that then also mean you can't use both a push and a stunt at the same time?

    Followup question, why would you choose to give someone a Complication instead of Stress?

    I can see why you would want to do both if you could use both at the same time, but now that you can't, I'm not sure. They give you the same benefit in an Action Scene but Stress stays around where Complications go away (unless you pay a Plot Point to make the Complication last longer).

    The same applies to push and stunt dice. If I can't use them at the same time, why would I ever use a push die?

    We've played 5 times now, every time with new players (many who have read the Operations Manuel) and these questions have been coming up quite a bit. I'm trying to create an advanced Cheat Sheet but I don't feel I have all the details nailed down yet. And we may be introducing the game to 20-50+ new people this weekend!
    As for Push and Stunt dice, isn't the Stunt bonus basically Push, but better? Push is sort of like "well, I need a bonus, but can't really justify it in any way fictionally, so here's just a bit of hand-waving" whereas Stunt is "I use this fictional element related to the situation or my character to justify getting a bonus." Hence Push dice being a D6 and Stunt dice being a D8.

    An as for Complications and Stress, Stress affects one person, whereas Complications are a broader effect, and thus could be weaved into your action against anyone potentially affected by it. Sure, if you're introducing a narrow Complication that really only affects one target, sure, Stress would make more sense. Otherwise, bringing forth a horde of paparazzi to interefere with a bunch of villains/heroes, or setting a room on fire to block two opposing sides from clashing (assuming of course they aren't immune to fire) can sometimes be more effective, if not more dramatic.

    At least, that's the way I've been reading into it.
  • Posted By: jenskotIf I spend a Plot Point to make an Asset last for the entire scene (rather than the next roll), does that mean:
    - We can roll it multiple times in a scene?
    - Can we roll it multiple times in the same Action Order?
    I'm not sure what you mean about rolling the Asset multiple times in the Action Order.

    Spending the PP on the Asset just means that it doesn't go away when used. Otherwise it follows the same rules as other dice, i.e., you can't tag it more than once in a given roll.

    Yes?
  • Posted By: jenskotSay I buy 4PP with 4XP.

    Would that actually mean I've bought 8PP with 4PP?

    I get 4PP now AND 4 more at the start of the next Act?

    Or does this mean that I get to keep 4 more at the start of the next Act, assuming I have any left to keep?
    No. 1XP = 1PP and +1 starting PP. It opens up a starting PP "slot", you might say.
    And of note, you don't get 4 starting XP next Act, you get it next session. Next Act, it all goes back to 1.
  • Posted By: LudantoNo. 1XP = 1PP and +1startingPP. It opens up a starting PP "slot", you might say.
    And of note, you don't get 4 starting XP next Act, you get it nextsession. Next Act, it all goes back to 1.
    I believe this is correct.

    What may be tricky is that "Breakout" is a mini-event, and thus the Acts are short enough you can do one or more in a single session. I'm assuming that full-on Event books will have Acts that you probably need a couple of sessions to complete.
  • I might make a ruling on Complications and Stress that allow one example of each to apply, which would encourage people to throw Complications around. This is something I'm going to address in the FAQ, I think. I would try playing it that way and seeing if that addresses your problem with nobody wanting to create Complications!

    Spending 1 XP on 1 PP can be done in any Transition Scene. If you have XP sitting around, you can use them to do this. It also increases the minimum amount of PP you have at the start of next session by +1, up to a maximum of 5. If you had 10 PP at the end of the last session, it doesn't come into play. If you had 2, you'd start with 5. At the beginning of each new Act, all of this resets.

    Stunt dice are just superior Push Dice, yes. You can't have both.

    Assets that are persistent can be used in any action or reaction where their inclusion is appropriate. There's no limit to that if they're sticking around, other than the fiction.

    Cheers,
    Cam
  • Posted By: stupidgremlinAn as for Complications and Stress, Stress affects one person, whereas Complications are a broader effect, and thus could be weaved into your action against anyone potentially affected by it.
    OM29: "Anyone can use a complication that’s been inflicted on a target, not just you."

    This sounds to me like Maneuvers in FATE; you're setting up a circumstance that aids you and the rest of your team. Like, say, as Cap, you know that you're not powerful enough to take out Thanos directly, but you figure you can get him distracted enough that SIlver Surfer can zip in and pull the Infinity Gauntlet off of his hand. (I also assume you'd be rolling maybe a more favorable die pool than you would just trying to punch him out.)

    But I dunno. I haven't played the game yet; just enthusiastic to talk about it.
  • Also, I as Spider-Man am not going to punch Wolverine (physical stress, which he can shrug off easily with his powers), I'm going to web him up (complications).
  • Posted By: stupidgremlinAs for Push and Stunt dice, isn't the Stunt bonus basically Push, but better? Push is sort of like "well, I need a bonus, but can't really justify it in any way fictionally, so here's just a bit of hand-waving" whereas Stunt is "I use this fictional element related to the situation or my character to justify getting a bonus." Hence Push dice being a D6 and Stunt dice being a D8.
    I think some of the confusion I've seen is that the name "Push dice" sounds awesome!

    It sounds like I'm pushing myself beyond my limits or breaking ties or doing something amazing. But it's effectively a power stunt except I don't have to describe what it is or be creative, so I get a D6 instead of a D8. All the additional names for traits have been confusing new players, fortunately the rules themselves work really well. Having to learn Affiliation, Distinction, Power, Specialty, Stunt, Stress, Trauma, Resource, Asset, Complication, Push... when they are all effectively traits, just used in slightly different ways is jarring. I assumed that the reason these were all named different things was to keep things simple and balanced when building Dice Pools. I can add any relevant Trait as long as I don't add Traits with the same name. So I can't add 2 Specialties unless I spend a Plot Point. But things get confusing when I have to choose between either a Push or a Stunt, a Complication or a Stress.
    Posted By: stupidgremlinAn as for Complications and Stress, Stress affects one person, whereas Complications are a broader effect, and thus could be weaved into your action against anyone potentially affected by it. Sure, if you're introducing a narrow Complication that really only affects one target, sure, Stress would make more sense. Otherwise, bringing forth a horde of paparazzi to interefere with a bunch of villains/heroes, or setting a room on fire to block two opposing sides from clashing (assuming of course they aren't immune to fire) can sometimes be more effective, if not more dramatic.
    That sounds pretty cool! But so far it reads as if Complications aren't broader effects. That's probably what you would use an Asset for.

    Complication:
    A complication is like stress because it’s
    often inflicted on you as a result of an action,
    but it’s also like an asset in reverse—you use
    an effect die to create a disadvantage for
    your opponent rather than an advantage for
    your hero. When a hero suffers a complication,
    his actions are harder to perform, much
    like stress. Unlike stress, complications don’t
    lead to trauma and usually go away once the
    situation is resolved. Heroes may also inflict
    complications on their opponents, useful
    when you just want to impair or hinder them.
    You can render someone helpless with a
    complication that’s stepped up beyond d12,
    which has much the same effect as being
    stressed out.

    To create a complication, use an effect die
    like you do to create an asset. Give it a name
    and a rating equal to the size of the effect die
    used to create it (minimum d6). You may add
    it to your dice pools against the target just
    as you would add stress.

    I’m playing Colossus and I’d rather wrap
    an iron bar around the Hellfire Guards
    than smash them. I roll my dice, including
    my Godlike Strength d12, and the
    Watcher rolls dice for the Guard. I get
    the higher total, so I can now use my
    d8 effect die to create a complication,
    rather than stress. I call it Bound in Iron
    d8 and now on future rolls against the
    Guard I can add the d8 to my pool.
    Anyone can use a complication that’s
    been inflicted on a target, not just you. That’s
    because the complication, like stress, is essentially
    a trait on the opponent’s datafile
    rather than one on yours.

    You can try to exploit a complication
    that’s been inflicted on you, just like you can
    exploit stress that’s been inflicted on you,
    but you need a good narrative reason to do
    it, and it steps up by one after you’ve used it,
    just like stress does when you use it this way.
    Asset:
    I’m playing Kitty Pryde and I’m trying to
    decrypt a firewall so that the rest of the
    X-Men can break into the Hellfire Club’s
    mansion. Putting together my dice pool
    from Distinctions, Specialties, and so on,
    I have a total pool of d10 + 2d6 + d4. I
    roll and get a total of 11 (7 on the d10, 4
    on a d6) and my effect die is a d6. Turns
    out the Watcher only got an 8 total when
    rolling the doom pool, so Kitty breaks
    through the encryption. I want to use
    the effect die to create an asset, so I
    declare Compromised Security d6 and
    can either give that to one of the other
    players or save it for another roll against
    the Hellfire Club’s computer system.
  • Posted By: Christian GriffenAlso, I as Spider-Man am not going to punch Wolverine (physical stress, which he can shrug off easily with his powers), I'm going to web him up (complications).
    Great point!
  • Yes, the names for different traits not only helps determine what you can use in a dice pool, but what specific SFX or other game mechanics can apply to or affect. Many of them also have specific rules that apply only to them, such as Distinctions and Specialties.

    Cheers,
    Cam
  • Posted By: CamBanksI might make a ruling on Complications and Stress that allow one example of each to apply, which would encourage people to throw Complications around. This is something I'm going to address in the FAQ, I think. I would try playing it that way and seeing if that addresses your problem with nobody wanting to create Complications!

    Spending 1 XP on 1 PP can be done in any Transition Scene. If you have XP sitting around, you can use them to do this. It also increases the minimum amount of PP you have at the start of next session by +1, up to a maximum of 5. If you had 10 PP at the end of the last session, it doesn't come into play. If you had 2, you'd start with 5. At the beginning of each new Act, all of this resets.

    Stunt dice are just superior Push Dice, yes. You can't have both.

    Assets that are persistent can be used in any action or reaction where their inclusion is appropriate. There's no limit to that if they're sticking around, other than the fiction.

    Cheers,
    Cam
    Thanks Cam!
  • Yeppers. Buzz and Christian described it better than I did.
  • Posted By: buzzPosted By: LudantoNo. 1XP = 1PP and +1startingPP. It opens up a starting PP "slot", you might say.
    And of note, you don't get 4 starting XP next Act, you get it nextsession. Next Act, it all goes back to 1.
    I believe this is correct.

    What may be tricky is that "Breakout" is a mini-event, and thus the Acts are short enough you can do one or more in a single session. I'm assuming that full-on Event books will have Acts that you probably need a couple of sessions to complete.
    I think you nailed it. Since we're playing Breakout and the Acts are short, some of this feels confusing where in a full blown event, I suspect it wouldn't be the case.
  • Posted By: jenskotBut so far it reads as if Complications aren't broader effects. That's probably what you would use an Asset for.
    OM29: "You can make an asset or complication last longer than a single roll or conflict by spending a Plot Point."

    Complication = inflicted on another character, e.g., a bunch of webbing on Wolverine.
    Asset = independent of other characters, e.g., the back door Kitty hacks into a security system.
  • edited March 2012
    To create a Complication that effects multiple people, I would say that you would add Effect Dice and use each to create the Complication for each of them. Area Effect SFX would be useful for this too and appears in many characters that have complicating powers that effect groups (Spidey is not one of them, so it would cost PP).

    On saying that, Complications can be exploited by anyone. So you can all take advantage of Wolverine being webbed for example.
  • Posted By: CamBanksStunt dice are just superior Push Dice, yes. You can't have both.
    And Resources are effectively scene length Speciality Stunts, which is why you can't have it with Push and Stunts either. They are all manifestations of the same sort of thing.
  • Posted By: SkywalkerOn saying that, Complications can be exploited by anyone. So you can all take advantage of Wolverine being webbed for example
    But, Stress can be exploited by anyone as well, right? Not much of a (lower case) distinction.
  • Posted By: LudantoPosted By: SkywalkerOn saying that, Complications can be exploited by anyone. So you can all take advantage of Wolverine being webbed for example
    But, Stress can be exploited by anyone as well, right? Not much of a (lower case) distinction.

    I think it's a question of "are you trying to stop them by hurting them?" or "are you trying to stop them without necessarily hurting them?"
  • Posted By: stupidgremlinI think it's a question of "are you trying to stop them by hurting them?" or "are you trying to stop them without necessarily hurting them?"
    But the only way to "stop" somebody is to stress them out until they give up or flee. A complication is just the scenic way of getting to the same end.
    Not that I have a problem with complications, though. Sometimes they just make more sense, regardless of the math.
  • You can't physically stress someone out without actually hurting them. You might not want to do that, so you can use complications instead. Spiderman might need to defeat the cops, but he doesn't want to start punching faces.

    Also, complications don't need to be "healed" so after the fracas, the cops get out of the webs and they're fine.
  • edited March 2012
    Stress's ultimate goal is to cause Trauma. Complications can stress out a character, but they can't inflict Trauma. You can choose not to inflict Trauma when stressing out a character, though.

    (Assets, Stress and Complications are all Effects. Ergo, there is some similarity in how they get used.)
  • Posted By: LudantoBut, Stress can be exploited by anyone as well, right? Not much of a (lower case) distinction.
    True.

    Though, as an aisde, it does distinguish Assets from Resources.
  • Posted By: John HarperYou can't physically stress someone out without actually hurting them. You might not want to do that, so you can use complications instead. Spiderman might need to defeat the cops, but he doesn't want to start punching faces.

    Also, complications don't need to be "healed" so after the fracas, the cops get out of the webs and they're fine.
    Yeah, the way I see it, Complications are mostly there so Spider Man can web someone up without beating the stuffing out of them (physically stressing them out), making them have a break down (emotionally stressing them out), or running rings around them logically until they can't think straight (mentally stressing them out).

    Instead, he just goes right for the webs.

    Complications could probably just be renamed "Webs" and you'd be fine. :P
  • Posted By: LudantoBut the only way to "stop" somebody is to stress them out until they give up or flee. A complication is just the scenic way of getting to the same end.
    Not that I have a problem with complications, though. Sometimes they just make more sense, regardless of the math.
    Not correct. If you step a Complication beyond D12, the person is helpless for the scene.
  • There are also loads of Powers and SFX that recover Stress but not Complications. As such, they can be effectively more sticky, and maybe even more so, if you spend a PP to make them last until the end of the next Action Scene.
  • Ooh, I didn't even think about that. The way to take down Wolverine is to use complications rather than Physical Stress.
  • Webbing Wolverine until he can't move is the only sane way for Spidey to take him out in fact.
  • edited March 2012
    Here is a question that looks frivolous, but isn't. What happens if you try to run the Rhino over with a freight train?

    The deal with the Rhino is that he's pretty dang tough, but not totally invulnerable. The GM isn't sure exactly what would happen, so he calls for a roll. Several things here:

    1. It seems like nothing exists "in the fiction" until someone creates it via an effect die to turn it into an asset or complication. (I guess the GM can create a "scene distinction," but that's still spending a mechanical element.) So you've got to create it via mechanics, probably by rolling dice.

    2. "In fiction," a freight train hitting a dude has got to be pretty dang bad-ass. But if you're rolling to create this thing, you might have a really crappy effect die.

    3. After you create the train as an asset of [SIZE], you've still gotta make your attack roll. Since you probably don't have a power set or skill related to vehicular homicide, you're rolling your affiliation + train asset + (maybe) a distinction. For most heroes, this is probably a worse dice pool than just punching somebody in the face.

    It's totally possible I've missed something in the rulebook about this and I'm being an idiot. But this isn't a "James is a crazy person" special case, because:

    * It's a little bit like the super-slick mechanics in 4e. The fluff on those power descriptions is kind of bullshit. What you've got is mechanical causes leading to mechanical effects, briefly passing through the fiction on the way. Improvisation and riffing on the fictional environment are certainly possible in 4e (uh, well, depending on the thirty-times errata'd skill mechanics, maybe not so much) but in any case is seldom the expected or optimal approach.

    * If you're familiar with Vincent Baker's clouds (fiction) and dice (mechanics) diagrams, it looks like a lot of the action in Marvel Heroic Roleplaying is dice-affecting-dice stuff. If something's impossible, or too easy, you don't need to roll the dice, but there may be neat ideas which fictionally ought to have certain properties but the dice-economy makes it difficult. I'm concerned that stuff which originates in the fiction doesn't have much bite.
  • edited March 2012
    Hmmm...normally, if it were a hero vs. a freight train, it'd be the hero's dice vs. a Doom Pool roll.

    But you're talking about a hero driving the freight train to run into the Rhino, right? Not just the Rhino going head-to-head with a random speeding train.

    Hmmmmm.....
  • edited March 2012
    Posted By: James_NostackHere is a question that looks frivolous, but isn't. What happens if you try to run the Rhino over with a freight train?
    There a number of possibilities. I guess the main thing to remember is that a train in most circumstances is not a very effective weapon. If its hits, it will hurt, but most people will be able to leap out of the way or whatever reducing its effect significantly.

    I think the best way to model it would be to create it as an Asset and then wait until Rhino rolls an Opportunity or three, stepping up the train beyond d12 with PP and hoping to use it as your Effect dice for an instant take down. I think this also models the difficulty of timing the freight train until Rhino slips up when he can take the full brunt of it.

    Another possibility, if you want to treat it as a one off thing would be a Stunt. Normally, these are d8, but again using Opportunities rolled by Rhino you can step this up to a d10 which is a hefty bonus.

    You could look to create it as a Resource too, though this would come in at a d8. I think this would be better at representing longer lived, smaller magnitude effects than what you suggest.

    Freight trains would be particularly effective if you had few fighting skills but tech and vehicle skills too.

    Finally, if the freight train were set up as a part of the scene, the GM could make it a Scene Effect that everyone could take advantage of. In fact, unless a PC arranged for the train to be there, the GM can award bonus dice for elements such as these under the RAW.
  • How is a 13 year old kid supposed to understand this, let alone explain the rules to their 13 year old friends?
  • Most Marvel comics readers/fans are not 13.

    Anyway, I played AD&D at 13 and that was way more complicated than this, by the time I got done arguing with everyone about everything.
  • Posted By: Nathan H.How is a 13 year old kid supposed to understand this, let alone explain the rules to their 13 year old friends?

    I played it for a few hours tonight. It plays pretty fast and once we were done we wanted to go back to the book and read up but it isn't initially that difficult or complicated, just very fiddily with lots of bits to push around in fun ways. But getting good at pushing those fiddily bits around would take a little re-reading is all.

    When I was 13, I was reading the Who's Who in the DC Universe and the Handbook of the Marvel Universe, statting obscure comic book characters out in the Champions system. This is nowhere near as complicated as that.
  • Posted By: SkywalkerNot correct. If you step a Complication beyond D12, the person is helpless for the scene.
    Hey, look at that! Well, that makes a significant difference.
  • Posted By: SkywalkerThere are also loads of Powers and SFX that recover Stress but not Complications. As such, they can be effectively more sticky, and maybe even more so, if you spend a PP to make them last until the end of the next Action Scene.
    Posted By: Bret GillanOoh, I didn't even think about that. The way to take down Wolverine is to use complications rather than Physical Stress.
    Great points!

    This solidly answers my question!
  • edited March 2012
    Posted By: Nathan H.How is a 13 year old kid supposed to understand this, let alone explain the rules to their 13 year old friends?
    My experience is that 13 year olds coming to this for the first find it as easy if not easier than MSHRP which I came to at that age. The initial hurdle is slightly higher but the other side is slightly easier.

    You will be surprised how clever 13 year olds can be.
  • Oh yeah. Especially the Advanced Set.
  • When I was 13 I was running every single game I could get my hands on with my friends - Shadowrun, Bughunters, Toon, Marvel Superheroes. If anything I think I have a harder time learning new rules at 30 than I did at 13.
  • My nine year old gets this game. He got it in one sitting. Granted, he's pretty smart, but then I think that's most kids who'd be into this. As Jason and Judd say, I don't think we give kids enough credit for getting things like this - in fact, I think we may all have put up with much worse when we were 13. I had a 12yo Rolemaster GM when I was 13. And we used all of the rules.

    Then we picked up FGU's Aftermath. And we used all of those rules, too. I'm still trying to block that out.

    Cheers,
    Cam
  • Okay, Complications and Assets confuse the crap out of me. Well, not everything about them does, just their timing. Help? Please?

    For the life of me I cannot find any hard and fast statement in the book on how long Assets and Complications last. I was able to find a line in the paragraph on extending Complications and Assets that says they last "a single roll or conflict", or until the end of the next Action Scene if a player spends a PP to keep it around. The impression I was left with of Assets is that they're meant to last only for one roll. Are Complications meant to be the same way as well? If so, do they stick around until someone decides to roll that die, or do they go away after the end of the round? Or maybe they hang out until the end of the current Action Scene? If so, once they're rolled, do Assets/Complications just go away? Or do they continue to hang out for the rest of the scene?

    Let me illustrate this with some experience that I had from Dreamation. The players in one group decided they wanted to beat up on Count Nefaria, a villain in the Breakout mini-event. Nefaria's flying all over the place, doing all sorts of sweet stuff with his kinetic manipulation abilities. Spidey and Daredevil got pretty fed up with that, so they threw two complications on him in a row; Spidey "Grounded d8" him, and DD "Bound d10" him. Now, the way I had read the rules, it seemed to me that the Complications lasted until the end of the scene unless a player spent the Complication die in one of his pools. I described this to the players, so they just left him there with those Complications on him and Nefaria writhed around on the ground for the rest of the Scene.

    Did I do this correctly? Or would the Complications worn off earlier, leaving Nefaria to wreak havoc all over our heroes? Would the players have been able to use the Complications they had heaped on Nefaria to beat him up some more without the Complication disappearing?
  • edited March 2012
    They last as long as they as they are narratively appropriate. It can be short as a single roll or as long as a scene.

    You can extend an Asset or Complication by spending a PP. They extend until the end of the next Action Scene, though they are still bound by the narrative so make sure the extension makes sense.

    You can look to recover Complication with recovery actions in Transition Scenes.

    You can also target Assets and Complications with actions to eliminate or reduce them.

    In the case of Neferia, the players would need to explain some way that what the PCs did would keep Neferia from simply taking off again, or I would adjudicate that it would only last a single roll. For example, perhaps he was stuck with webs to the ground. In this case, it would last as long as either Neferia broke the web, by targeting the Complication, or some other narrative reason for the web breaking came up (such as the place being on fire).
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