Why is GxB not weird for adults to play?

edited March 2012 in Story Games
I was telling my girlfriend this evening about my purchase of GxB, thinking that finally here was a game she might actually enjoy, and she suddenly seemed very concerned and creeped right the hell out that a 28-year-old man would want to play a game as a teenage girl/boy looking for love. How do I explain to her that this is not creepy, it is innocent fun about innocent kids growing up, and that it is all in good fun, and that you are not your character, etc? Seriously, I think she thinks I'm fucking nuts for buying it...and a weird-ass creep for wanting to actually play it. Help?
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  • "Yeah, I guess it's pretty weird when you think about it as a 28-year-old man wanting to pretend to be a teenager going on a date. On the other hand, part of what's exciting about roleplaying in general is getting to step outside of your skin and imagine the world from new points of view. And with teenagers specifically, part of what's cool is how close to the surface the drama is. Teenagers are both irrational and forthright in ways that adults aren't, which can make for really interesting and engaging stories. So yeah, I guess it's weird, but it's also really cool."

    Then shrug emphatically, drop the subject, and go back to dicing onions (or whatever it is that you were just doing).

    Wait a day, or three, or five. This'll give the notion time to sink in, and your girlfriend can engage it in her mind without you trying to drill your opinion into her brain. Maybe she'll decide that the cool outweighs the weird, but maybe she won't. Say your piece, give her time, allow her to come to her own conclusions. That's the fair and respectful thing to do.

    Then, after 1/3/5 days, you can say, "So, I know you said GxB sounded weird. But I was wondering if you wanted to try it out. Are you into it?"

    If she likes the idea of a roleplaying game where people go on three dates, but doesn't like the teen aspect, then Breaking the Ice might work for her.
  • Hm. Yeah, she doesn't really "get" RPGs and thinks they're weird in the first place, and I also asked her about the three-dates-but-not-teens type of game, and she is having none of that either. I can't really seem to get through to her that it is both okay and desirable to be something completely other than you are in the context of a game, all in the interest of coming up with cool collaborative stories. God help me if she ever runs across my copies of Monsterhearts.
  • I feel you buddy. My wife used to play Vampire as a teen but now wonders why I never grew out of it (or why I'm not making money off of it). I don't for the life of me understand. She likes horror/fantasy/acting/videogames/boardgames/writing/reading but RPGs are "kind of silly, aren't they."
  • Sorry that she dropped those heavy judgements on you, Joseph.

    For your specific situation, i don't have any advice - from what you've said, i don't think she's interested.


    Don't take it on, though, right? All sorts of people like different stuff. I dated someone who was icked out by pretending to be someone else in an rpg, too. We had a lot of fun doing other stuff, and i played rpgs with other people.
  • Life is short, yo. Find somebody who doesn't think your interests are creepy.
  • edited March 2012
    Yeah, it seems like we departed the realm of "how to pitch RPGs" and entered the realm of "how to negotiate disparate interests in a relationship."

    If you're feeling judgment about your interests, especially if your significant other is finding it creepy that you're into roleplaying a teen romance, reading through some Savage Love back-articles may provide you with some useful responses and thoughts.

    Edited to add a note: In general, Savage Love is a great resource for people dealing with RPG social contract issues. Being a good and communicative and supportive roleplayer involves much of the same skill-set that being a "good, giving, and game" lover requires.
  • Posted By: jackson teguDon't take it on, though, right? All sorts of people like different stuff. I dated someone who was icked out by pretending to be someone else in an rpg, too. We had a lot of fun doing other stuff, and i played rpgs with other people.
    Jackson's words are true words.

    My wife /gets it/, but we love anime (I'm 37, she's 38 mind). We watched and loved Fruits Basket, Azumanga Daioh (the manga far more than the anime mind), Vampire Princess Miyu, even Battle Athletes (which I have every reason to utterly hate but to my amazement I do not!), not to mention the show Vampire Diaries. Not to mention that she's played dating sims on the PS2 (even the racy Japanese queer ones, with me standing over her shoulder to tell her to hook up with THIS GUY and not THAT GUY in the Shinsengumi dating sim!) in the past.

    People are squicked out by different things, you'll likely just have to let it go and play with others.

    No RAWWWWRRRRR! required, it might just be different tastes and that's cool.
  • Oh no, it's not just that. It's now that I've brought up that I own a game about teenagers going on first dates, she's squicked about me wanting to play it, not her. Like, I can't seem to convince her that that is a normal, healthy thing to want to do.
  • How does she feel about your My Little Pony/Tron unicorn icon?
  • Sounds like you're not going to convince her. Best thing is to just be like, "Ok, whatever, I'm comfortable liking it even though you think I'm weird for it."
  • I don't think she's ever seen the TronPony. I'm actually not a brony myself, but everyone was getting them for a MLP week at Giantitp.com, so I asked for a Tron one. Because Tron is the shit. And my username is an homage to the D20 version of it, called Virtual.

    I'm not sure what it is I'm even trying to get out of this thread other than sympathy at this point, because I explained that I was okay with her thinking me weird, and she was like, not okay with that either. She was just really upset about what seems like absolutely nothing wrong to me. Wonder what she'd have thought if I'd also had BxB? That I was or wanted to be gay? Totally not getting where she's coming from here.
  • I can't help but laugh a little about what a "28 year old's" predicament you're in.

    This strikes me as-- just the type of thing that 28 year olds find themselves grappling with.

    Apologies for lumping you in with some vague stereotype I apparently hold, but... there you have it.

    Counterintuitively, a rapidly-aging 48 year old is actually LESS disconcerting, when he pines for Winnie from the Wonder Years, or whatever. Because the wistful, hopeless longing is more obviously justified.
  • Hey Joseph, there's absolutely nothing wrong with you.

    If you've been honest with her, and she's weirded out, that's on her. I don't know what else we can say.
  • Posted By: Jesse CoombsHey Joseph, there's absolutely nothing wrong with you.

    If you've been honest with her, and she's weirded out, that's on her. I don't know what else we can say.
    Yeah. This is a net positive, because you are learning things about each other.
  • Huh. I mean, clearly there are any number of logical arguments one could muster: for example, twentysomething actors play teenagers on TV and in films ALL the time.

    But clearly this isn't about logical arguments, this is about your girlfriend not understanding you and why you roleplay in general, and dealing with that is about communication, not argument.

    On that front I would say that saying things like "it is okay for you to think me weird" are probably not constructive directions. The best way might be to explain starting from something she does understand and is comfortable with, and even maybe has experience with, like acting. Try to talk honestly and and candidly about your motivations when you roleplay, but also shy away from the idea of "being another person" and words like "fantasy" or "immersion" as these are likely to be misconstrued. Instead try to frame it in familiar terms using activities she does see as normal (again, like acting, on a stage or on screen) as examples and metaphors.
  • edited March 2012
    Why is GxB not weird for adults to play?
    I don't know what that is but sounds like it is weird for adults to like it. Kind of like roleplaying games in general. It's a roleplaying game, right? Some people can be quite judgmental about the whole thing. It's okay to be weird though. Sometimes others will accept the weirdness or even join in and sometimes they won't. Such is.

    As for teenagers, a lot of people watch television programs like Glee, which is largely about teenagers and their relationship drama. So liking media about teenagers is not abnormal for adult Americans. It is expected behaviour. Transformers is also about teens (and robots) and my dad thinks it's a very exciting film. He's not an American but he is mostly normal. There is, I suppose, a possibility that she has misinterpreted the goals of the game and believes that you have a cheerleader-centric or teen-centric sexual fetish of some sort. I think a lot of people have a fetish for teen-centric media but in most cases it's not sexual at all.

    Now I looked it up. The other thing is that the artwork is based around high-school anime, which has a many and varied politics. So this one deals with the Japanese fetishisation of teen romance, as opposed to the american, which many americans consider weird. Even though their own is kosher. High school anime often portray their central characters as painfully simplistic individuals with strong and definite personality traits. So if someone asked me if I wanted to play this game, that's what I would think I was in for. I would definitely not expect any of the stuff in Joe's post because it's not generally present in high school anime. Maybe your girlfriend is concerned that you feel that your relationship would be more interesting if viewed through the lens of high school anime romance? There's a billion ways ways to misinterpret any given thing that's perceived to be <i>other</i>.

    I'm, of course, probably not being helpful. For one, teen media isn't really my thing unless the central characters are filthy miscreants up to no good, and for another I usually deal with people thinking something I like is weird by being an alienating prick until they drop the subject. The first means I'm kind of unqualified although I can certainly offer lots of perspective on why people might not like a teeny game, the second means anything I say is most likely bad advice for dealing with nice ordinary people. edit: the most sound advice is in jackson's post i think?
  • edited March 2012
    Posted By: bigglesThe other thing is that the artwork is based around high-school anime, which has a many and varied politics.
    Yeah, maybe it's the style that's making things weird for her? There are still people out there for whom anime = tentacle porn, or fetishization of little kids, or whatever.
  • Joseph,

    It is important, now, while she is your girlfriend and not your fiance or wife, for you to seriously and deeply consider how this is going to impact the rest of your life. Right now you are at an age where you are transitioning from the college age time where you hang out with friends a lot into the "settled" time, where you are your friends all start settling down and marrying and buying houses and developing careers and having kids and all that stuff.

    Right around the corner is coming a period of time where your leisure activities will go from being relatively abundant to being much more narrow and focused. When you have kids, liesure activities become nearly nonexistant for the first 2-3 years. And you should put some serious thought into how this relationship is going to impact what gets whittled out of your social calendar. How much do you want roleplaying to be a part of your life 10 years from now, and how is this relationship going to affect that?

    I hope this doesn't come off as unwarrentedly personal. I don't know you well and I don't know your girlfriend. I only know what I'm reading in this thread, and I know that I've seen your name on this forum quite often, from which I gauge your interest in rpgs to be significant. So I know I may well be out of line by recommending that you but serious thought into evaluating your relationship. If I offend, I apologize.

    I'm 38 with a wife who doesn't really get roleplaying. She has tried it a handful of time over the past 20 years that we've been together, but she always feels self-conscious about it - always feels like she's somehow doing it wrong (which is ironic, because she's actually quite good at it whenever she stops second guessing herself or tuning out). But key is the fact that she's never been opposed to me participating - as long as it doesn't involve me spending too much time away from her and my son. Because of that, I've never been able to participate in a long term regular campaign meeting on a regular basis - much of my RP time comes at the local conventions that I attend pretty regularly 3 weekends a year. And now that my son is old enough to play, we spent last year hosting a lightweight biweekly game at our house that she participated in, though some evenings she would bow out and do things like dishes or work on grading (she's a teacher).

    In being in a relationship with her, I needed to accept that it would have a significant impact on my gaming life, which is important because it's an area that I'm passionate about. I get to do some things, but not everything I might want to. My wife is mostly supportive of my interests, though she considers them to be low on the scale of important things - lower than I would place them myself - which occasionally leads to some conflict and discussion.

    Here's the thing - if she was any more opposed to my gaming interests than she currently is, I don't know if it would work.

    But that's me. You know yourself best.

    I'm just trying to give you something to think about. It's certainly not for me to tell you what to do, other than to encourage you to consider your options carefully and to be prepared to accept the results of your choices.
  • edited March 2012
    I'll argue a little bit for the prosecution just because nobody else is:

    I'm married and have played GxB and thought it was harmless but I did sort of 'throw' the game - I purposely played a guy I thought the girl would never go for. If a guy was playing the girl I might have played harder to 'win' because at some level I feel like I'm a little infidelious (made up word but you know what I mean) - which is maybe weird? When my character cuts your character's head off in a game I'm completely separated from it, it doesn't occur to anyone that I really want to attack you IRL, but with romance there's more bleed I guess. (This could happen in real life! Will she (the player) think I (the player) am really into her? What would my wife think?)

    Also, I've heard stories about married men who have girlfriends (or even wives?) in Second Life, and I don't understand why their real-life wives put up with it. I won't call it creepy - it might even be natural - hey, who wouldn't want a fantasy mistress - but if my wife had some fantasy husband/lover on the side in some MUD or something I would freak out.

    GxB isn't that, but it is a tiny baby step in that direction.

    So for me I have this continuum: Adultery - wrong. A long term pretend adulterous relationship - wrong. Doing a kissing scene in a play - not sure, probably wrong (those Hollywood marriages don't last too long, do they?). One session of pretend dating - okay. But maybe your girlfriend draws the line at a different place than I do. Maybe she's not so much creeped out as in she thinks you're creepy - because, yeah, that wouldn't be cool - but creeped out because you're her guy and you shouldn't be looking elsewhere, even pretend? (In which case maybe you should be a little flattered that she's jealous.)

    And, in which case (after a cooling off period) maybe you could narrow it down. "Is it because you're a little jealous? What if I play the girl? Would that still bother you? What if a guy plays the girl? Would that still bother you? What if it's a girl player, but she plays the guy and I play the girl?"


    My wife doesn't get my roleplaying either, fwiw. When I come home from a game night and tell her, "I was a widow who seduced a samurai so he'd save our village!" she'll say something like "In your head?" but she's never begrudged me for the (usually homosexual) seduction stuff that goes on in my games.
  • Posted By: jdfristrom
    Also, I've heard stories about married men who have girlfriends (or even wives?) in Second Life, and I don't understand why their real-life wives put up with it. I won't call it creepy - it might even be natural - hey, who wouldn't want a fantasy mistress - but if my wife had some fantasy husband/lover on the side in some MUD or something I would freak out.

    GxB isn't that, but it is a tiny baby step in that direction.
    For what it's worth: at least some of those people recognize Second Life relationships as existing outside of monogamy, and negotiate those boundaries as one would a non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship. An old friend of mine recognized that kink was important to him, that it wasn't desirable to his wife, and they sat down and negotiated sex-centric Second Life play as something that would meet everyone's needs and leave everyone feeling secure about their involvement in the relationship. (For others, I'm sure it's decidedly less healthy and negotiated).

  • My gf and I are just starting to talk more thoroughly about what happens in the games I play. She's not really interested in tabletop gaming, mostly because the idea of "being on the spot" and having to make up stuff is anxiety-inducing for her, but she's played Castle Ravenloft, listened in to a bit of our Freemarket game (including a part about implanting false memories of sexual encounters), and has some sense about what it is that I do on "game nights." She's only the second person I've dated that had any sense of what my hobby life is like and has, for the most part, been really supportive.

    One thing that's helped, I think, is comparing the squickier games I've played to media that she likes (or both of us like). Frex, I describe Monsterhearts as the "Being Human/Twilight game," which makes all the monster-on-monster romance seem appropriate and less creepy. GxB may be harder if she's not really into anything that's in that vein (like Andy says: anime, dating sim video games, etc.). That's cool. I mean, I honestly think a lot of that stuff is pretty squicky too (elementary-school dating sims, anyone? yeah). Nobody should necessarily get a pass or unconditional support, right? There's a lot of things that are really creepy and problematic! So just do you best to explain it or let it drop and -- if it continues to be an issue -- deal with it then, make a compromise, or come to some other solution. That's the best you can do, really. Decide to what extent these things are important to you (playing GxB, having your gf's support, etc.) and do what makes sense. Maybe she has totally valid concerns (I don't really get any sense of what her concerns are in this thread) or maybe not.
  • edited March 2012
    Gaming will definitely be more and less important to you at different times in your life but one thing I've learned is that you can't make someone interested in something, all you can do is let them see you having lots of fun and let them know the door is open for them.

    I maintain that gamers make great spouses. They tend to take relationships seriously and do a lot of self- and relationship-reflection.
  • Posted By: jdfristromIn which case maybe you should be a little flattered that she's jealous.
    While i respect jaime immensely & agree with several of his "speaking on behalf of the prosecution" points, i just wanted to call this sentence out as being landmine territory. Be a little flattered if she compliments you. Jealousy isn't a compliment, it's an abyss.


    & speaking more generally,
    We all had wildly different experiences being teens, especially in the romance department. Maybe teenagerhood isn't something that Joseph's gf has nostalgic memories for.

    &
    Posted By: mease19you can't make someone interested in something, all you can do is let them see you having lots of fun and let them know the door is open for them.
  • Posted By: jdfristromAnd, in which case (after a cooling off period) maybe you could narrow it down. "Is it because you're a little jealous?
    It could be that having this discussion would be helpful.

    But, for gods' sake, whatever you do, don't start a conversation with that sentence.

    Totally puts the other person on the defensive and destroys any chance of meaningful conversation.

    But, yeah, finding a way to meaningfully engage with that question may be helpful, if you think that maybe the romantic content in particular is what she's squicky about. Which is very possible.
  • hmm not to go all advice mode but maybe you'd have better luck finding a game she likes if you just look for them together?

    For what it's worth, the premise of GxB kind of turned me away because 'pretend to be a teenager' doesn't sound like fun at all to me and I can see why it would come across as creepy to others.
  • Rob's spot on the money here.
    Posted By: UserCloneI'm not sure what it is I'm even trying to get out of this thread other than sympathy at this point, because I explained that I was okay with her thinking me weird, and she was like, not okay with that either. She was just really upset about what seems like absolutely nothing wrong to me. Wonder what she'd have thought if I'd also had BxB? That I was or wanted to be gay? Totally not getting where she's coming from here.
    She's coming from a different play space than you. That's a term from drama therapy* that means what is okay to play with. There are things you are okay with playing with (not just games: jokes, stories, inuendo, friendly comments, not-so friendly comments, acting, etc).

    She's not only doesn't want to play with it, but she's not okay with you wanting to play it. She may have very good reasons for that (or most importantly, reasons you believe are good and worth protecting), reasoning that could use reevaluation, or she may have never really thought about it. Since you emphasized that you hoped you "finally" found a game she would enjoy, I'm wondering if she's had a problem with other games as well, or if this just crossed a particular line.

    The most important thing about a relationship isn't enjoying all of each others interests. However, it's critical that you enjoy each other enjoying your interests. But instead she's uncomfortable - not just with you playing it (which is a red flag that needs resolution) but with you wanting to play it. Which means she has a problem with what you're interested in, which means she has a problem with you. It may be minor, it may in fact be nothing with her (maybe she was joking in a way that's outside of your play space, so you interpreted it as a problem - this is just as likely), but it's something that is about something bigger than just this game. It's probably worth a discussion.

    The main sign of potential in a relationship comes down to that. Do both people care enough about each other to expand their personal play space to account for the idiosyncrasies and quirks and weirdness of the other? Maybe she does, but she doesn't know how (or even know that it's possible - "normal is normal!").

    It's not "weird" to play GxB, or any other consensual moral activity (it's unusual, but RPGs in general are niche and unusual). It's up to you to figure out why it's become weird in your relationship and whether that's worth resolving by working out the disagreement on what's "okay to play" or by moving on and out of a relationship that might be attempting to modify and restrict your play space, instead of allowing you to expand it.

    *Just to be clear, I'm not a therapist nor trying to be, just using some helpful technology I'm familiar with because I know several drama therapists.
  • Well I originally got it because I liked the JedixSith add-on and wanted to be able to play that, but after reading it and hearing someone's podcast on having a lot of fun with it and his high-school age gaming club, I, while not necessarily super-interested in the game, certainly didn't see anything wrong with saying that it was a game I would play. Either way, she thinks that it's immature and such for a grown man to pretend to battle against evil desert elves too, but that pretending to go on dates with teenagers is just squicky and deeply concerning.

    And Jamie, she actually opened with the argument that it would be creepy as fuck to pretend to be a teenage girl. And then I foolishly replied that so what? I could be the guy. So of course now it's weird to want to pretend to date a teenage girl. There's really no win in that direction.
  • @Alvin: She did seem to genuinely enjoy our brief one-session game of Mouse Guard that never got off the ground. She was a mouse called Quentin and I GM'd. But when I brought it up, she claimed to have only thought it was at all fun because I seemed to be enjoying it. And that she thought the pictures of mice in the book were cute.
  • To put it in terms of a Story Now premise:

    How much of your gaming self are you willing to give up in order to continue this relationship?

    She's coming at you with a hard move, man. Say yes or roll the dice.
  • Maybe I'm getting too meta, but I suddenly want to make a roleplaying poem out of this or something.

    In the end, after much discussion, we decided that it was specifically the teen dating sim that she was not kosher with, and that other, non-fetish-potential games are okay with her. This is agreeable enough for me, since like I said, I originally bought the game for a system to go with JxS. *shrug?*
  • Sounds like a very reasonable outcome.

    My wife gets squicky about things along the lines of Little Fears, as do some of the folks I play with, which is a big part of why I never played it (though I don't think she'd be squicked out if I happened to find a game of it at a convention). The idea of creating fiction about young kids in danger with potential abuse content is way in her lines/veils range.

    So if fetishy romance is out, that's not an unreasonable compromise, at least in my opinion. No Fisherman's Wife for you.
  • Posted By: UserCloneAnd Jamie, she actually opened with the argument that it would be creepy as fuck to pretend to be a teenage girl.
    Well then I got nothing.

    Except maybe that I played a teenage girl 4 nights ago. Social proof?


    And Rob's probably right that opening with 'jealous?' probably not a good call.
  • Posted By: jdfristromExcept maybe that I played a teenage girl 4 nights ago. Social proof?
    I think this is more of a lines & veils sort of thing. You aren't going to convince her (at least not through short term argumentation) that it's an ok thing.

    The idea of an adult wanting to play out underage romance themes is not acceptable to her - I assume it comes to close to being a form of potential virtual statutory rape. Which, presumably, is a hot button of some sort for her.

    So now Joseph knows that and has accepted it. If, in the future, he wants to loosen her expectations up a bit, he might want to venture to get her to a stage where she doesn't mind if he plays a game like that, as long as she isn't involved. Which may or may not ever happen. Or it may not be important enough to Joseph to establish that as acceptable.

    In the mean time, you may want to attempt to engage her in something relatively lightweight but without the orky fantasy overtones that she's expressed a lack of interest in. Maybe something like pulp adventure or Dresden Files or non-fantasy detective stories or something else she's interested in. Best of luck. Took me 19 years to get my wife to do tabletop (which she only really took up because my son was old enough to play).
  • Posted By: jackson teguPosted By: jdfristromIn which case maybe you should be a little flattered that she's jealous.
    While i respect jaime immensely & agree with several of his "speaking on behalf of the prosecution" points, i just wanted to call this sentence out as being landmine territory. Be a little flattered if she compliments you. Jealousy isn't a compliment, it's an abyss.

    There's also no indication that she's jealous. That's pure speculation, with basically no foundation. She said she thought it was weird. That's a clear statement. Why then surmise she's actually jealous?
  • I didn't really surmise. I said 'maybe' - just a hypothesis. Trying to read myself into the situation - and trying to be charitable. Because calling me creepy & weird wouldn't be cool, but being 'concerned and creeped out' because I'm flirting with other people - that I can understand. Anyhow, I stand corrected.
  • Posted By: McdaldnoFor what it's worth: at least some of those people recognize Second Life relationships as existing outside of monogamy, and negotiate those boundaries as one would a non-monogamous or polyamorous relationship.
    And - sure. I was thinking of a particular news story I'd seen where the wife was clearly not happy about it and clearly said so but the husband ignored her.
  • I think the problem from the beginning was in the pitch. Calling GxB a romantic comedy RPG probably would have went over better. Sell it along the lines of PTA but with less crunch.
    --
    TAZ
  • Well, it IS potentially creepy to pretend to be a teenage girl if you're not one (by which I mean, if you're too old to be one) - outside of the context of something deliberately framed as performance, as opposed to like, fantasised desire, or deception.

    The key here is the distinction between portraying something as performance and embodying something as fantasy. Do you want to be a teenage girl, or do you just think it could be fun to portray one?
  • Most emphatically the latter. I think it would be a fun, dynamic, lighthearted experience with lots of laughter. It also has the added appeal of being a world apart from the typically violent action/fantasy/sci-fi fare found in the american roleplaying scene.
  • This all reminds me of the fantasy baseball scene in 40 Year Old Virgin.
  • Joseph, thanks for buying GxB. Heather and I both appreciate it. I hope you enjoy playing it. I hope your girl friend can get over herself and also enjoy it, or at least get out of your way.

    For the rest of you, here's a link to the Cel*Style site. We make a lot of different games. If you're not creeped out by playing teenagers you'll probably like them.

    Jake
  • I've been going over this and over this in my head and I can't find the angle where it isn't creepy. Roleplaying is just kinda creepy.

    But is that so bad? I mean, lots of people have creepy hobbies. Birdwatching is super creepy. So is taxidermy.

  • Yeah, humans are creepy.

    And also, it's a pretty damn American (and probably Japanese and Norwegian and whatever else) experience to leave high school and then think/reminisce/dream/daydream/revenge dream/wish-fulfillment dream about high school, and childhood in general. Everyone does that, right? I mean, that's just dealing with the past, which is a pretty universal human thing.
  • Well, sure! I mean, by that kind of a definition of creepy, acting in general is creepy.
  • Posted By: shreyasBirdwatching is super creepy.
    Especially for the birds!
  • I actually now own hardcopies of every Cel*Style game except for BxB, just out of lack of personal interest in yaoi. Quick, someone join mein the spontanecon thread this Friday and let's play one of them! Ocean, anyone?

    Also, there is nothing at all creepy about birdwatching. Then again, birdwatching isn't meant to take place within or near neighborhoods, but instead in more of a wilderness setting, lol
  • Just got my Monsterhearts pdfs. I am looking forward to "gettin' creepy" with this game soon.

    I think collecting anything is creepier than role-playing.*



    * I collect some things. Not fanatically or anything. I can quit anytime I want...
  • Yeah, Monsterhearts is a whole 'nother kettle of fish. Played it once (so far) at GPNW last year, and in that short session there were a bunch of violent confrontations, involuntary druggings and one bout of angry sex. Oh, and I was playing a teenage girl.

    As for the initial point of this thread: sorry, man. That sucks.
  • Posted By: nemomemeJust got my Monsterhearts pdfs. I am looking forward to "gettin' creepy" with this game soon.

    I think collectinganythingis creepier than role-playing.*
    Does that make people who collect rpgs double-creepy?
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