A love letter for Jason Corley

edited March 2012 in Story Games
Dear Jason,

I was reading a .pdf of V:tM Revised last night on a layover in Miami.
I read the Storytelling chapter again.

And you know what I found?
ST Principles. ("Involve the players whenever possible", "Avoid stereotypes", "Description, dialogue, and action")
Something kind of like small-scale Principles; not quite Moves, but close. ("Make each scene vivid with detail", "Make your ST characters individuals", "Act out the conversation")

I took another look at the section on creating stories, and honestly the format can be read as "Pick a content-theme, like personal revenge, millenialism, or factional struggle. Now, think of a kicker that engages this theme AND the players' characters." [2 of the 3 examples given are actually really solid; only one of them is a classic "hook" in that the onus is on the players to take an offer, as opposed to their unlives being threatened and they must respond]
Advice on creating cool NPCs follows.

So basically, even though there are elements of the game and the game-advice I don't care for (I'm working on a hack for Humanity, and the text does strongly suggest that the game should be about the story the ST wants to tell - - see p257 "Written In Blood"), this is a pretty comprehensive, detailed how-to on running the game.

Of course, when I encountered the game in high school, I mainly got my play advice from InQuest magazine.
"Yes, of course, the vozhd in the warehouse was just a dream sequence!" Seriously though, vozhds are the creepiest, awesomest thing ever.
or
"Yes, of course, casting the darkness ritual in daytime teleports you to the world of Mad Max!" Because seriously, Mad Max is one of the awesomest things ever. There was a high laser-sharking quotient when I was in high school.

So the advice may have just gone over my head at the time. ^__^

Consider this a companion thread to the 3e DMG discussion.

Love and kisses,
your MC, Z in VA

Comments

  • Vampire is a pretty great game. And yes, in high school, we all played as high schoolers must.

    You're very welcome. Now REMEMBER this next time.

    (Wait, next time what?)
  • Posted By: Zac in Virginia"Pick a content-theme, like personal revenge, millenialism, or factional struggle. Now, think of a kicker that engages this theme AND the players' characters."
    Kicker isn't quite the right term. Kickers in Sorcerer are player-written. Bangs are the things that GMs write to challenge PCs. But maybe Storyteller does mean for the GM to write that Kicker for the PC, which is an interesting difference between those games and Sorcerer--consistent with "the text does strongly suggest that the game should be about the story the ST wants to tell."
  • Definitely. The choice of Theme and Tone as the core organizing method of the world is really important.

    The player-selected part of the "kicker" (what a shit piece of jargon that is, who is doing the kicking? someone else, probably, but are they the kicker? they are not, some inanimate thing or situation is a kicker BAHHHH DAMN KIDS) is their Virtue and Vice.
  • Agreements all 'round.
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