Suggestions for some low-level, free D&D modules

edited March 2012 in Story Games
Our D&D campaign that I've discussed now and then just had its 67th session a few days back. However, what follows is only laterally related: a certain friend of mine has moved to a culturally dead town in western Finland, and being as how he apparently can't get a gaming group going to save his life, we decided to try our hands at a bit of interwebs gaming. Said friend has played OSR-style D&D with me a bit, but doesn't entirely grog it, so we decided to gather up some other long-distance friends and play some D&D. For the sake of simplicity we're just going to treat this as a side franchise of my on-going sandbox campaign, so I'll be recycling the specifics of rules calls, campaign geography and so on. If the online platform proves satisfying and we'll make this a regular thing, no doubt the online crew and the local party will come to cross swords sooner or later.

All fine and good so far. However, what material should I run for this new online group? I don't want to reuse the dozen-ish good low-level modules that we've already used in our tabletop campaign - not that there is technically anything preventing me, but if I can avoid it, I'd rather just not repeat locations. (Easier to keep everything straight in my head over the long term if I don't need to remember two separate lays of the Tomb of the Iron God, you understand.) Also, another friend of mine who has his own OSR-style campaign in Helsinki is also participating, and we've been swapping adventure material quite a bit, so chances are that if I use my current trove, we'll stumble on something he's been reading recently. All in all, I find myself in sudden need for some new material.

Here's what I've got so far:
  • I could just declare that we're playing Carcosa. (Or Fomalhaut from Fight On, for that matter, or Vornheim for somewhat different but still decidedly unearthly color.) Takes the campaign away from the semi-historical "fantasy-Europe" we've been playing in, which helps a bit in selecting adventures, because I could use all that swords & sorcery stuff that's been underutilized in our on-going campaign so far. The disadvantage is that there's less fruitful friction between the campaigns if I go to a distant planet like this. And of course, I'd still need to gather up some Carcosa-compatible adventure modules to begin with, all the same; Carcosa itself provides just a backdrop.
  • Another approach would be to put the Isle of the Unknown somewhere close by to our current campaign tromping grounds, and either place the new stuff there or just provide journeying there as one of the alternatives to the players from the start. The Isle is like eg. Carcosa in that it's just a vague backdrop, though; it helps, but I'll be needing specific adventures, too.
  • I've got just I think one or two proper low-level adventure modules lined up that the tabletop group has not been tromping over and that are probably not familiar to the player base here. One is the Courtyard of Gerald the Red, while the other is The Thing in the Valley. For a proper sand-box kickstart I'd be more comfortable if I had a couple more, especially as the Thing is more akin to a random encounter event than a proper target for an expedition.
  • I do have a surfeit of mid-to-high level adventures available. Some are well-designed and provide meaningful content for a starter-level party, too; also, there's no reason why resources might not be exported from the tabletop games, so maybe the party won't be low-level long if this platform of play catches on. Still, I'll be needing more low-level stuff, too.
  • I suppose I could just write my own adventure stuff. I'd rather not, though, unless I've already tapped everything the Internet has to offer in this regard. Prepping adventures takes time, and I'm spending too much time on this D&D campaign already when I should be working on other projects.
Looking the above list of resources over, I think I'll be pretty good to go with either the civilized fantasy-Europe setting or a more primal sword & sorcery one once I select a few more adventures. Ideally I'd like to do this session (and possible campaign, campaign branch or whatever we're doing) in my favoured sandbox style: here's your starting town, here are some rumours and lore about the neighbourhood, now choose your own best method for striking it rich. My experience so far indicates that it'd be good to have even half a dozen different adventure locales in my bandolier; some I'll drop into the setting to start, and others I'll need in case the players end up doing some long-distance travel or a random overland encounter indicates a special adventure site, or so on.

Well, I think the above explains what I'm looking for pretty well: if you've got some suggestions for free D&D adventures in the 'net that are not by the ever-excellent Dyson Logos (we're all over that stuff already), that'd be great. The color doesn't matter, I'll just see what I can find and then recommend either Carcosa or the more conventional setting to the players once I see what I've got to work with.

Comments

  • Hi Eero

    This is a fairly naive suggestion, but what would happen if you took the higher level adventures and weakened all the opposition in it somewhat, together with a light reskinning? Perhaps it would be too much effort, but I understand that the way you are playing isn't predicated on perfect 'game balance' - so if it errs towards being a little gnarly in places, them's the breaks and the party should recognise it.

    Best
    Alex
  • I suspect this link will be of use.

    I can't specifically suggest any of those, but I've heard good things about Challenge of the Frog Idol.
  • Posted By: Alex FThis is a fairly naive suggestion, but what would happen if you took the higher level adventures and weakened all the opposition in it somewhat, together with a light reskinning?
    Yeah, too much work. Specifically, I'd need to get into a very different mind-frame to rebalance things.
    Posted By: TeataineI suspectthis linkwill be of use.
    Yes! This is exactly what I wanted. Most excellent.
  • edited March 2012
    Posted By: Eero TuovinenI could just declare that we're playingCarcosa. (OrFomalhautfrom Fight On, for that matter, orVornheimfor somewhat different but still decidedly unearthly color.) Takes the campaign away from the semi-historical "fantasy-Europe" we've been playing in, which helps a bit in selecting adventures, because I could use all that swords & sorcery stuff that's been underutilized in our on-going campaign so far. The disadvantage is that there's less fruitful friction between the campaigns if I go to a distant planet like this. And of course, I'd still need to gather up some Carcosa-compatible adventure modules to begin with, all the same; Carcosa itself provides just a backdrop.
    You could place the weirdness on a nearby planet, instead of a distant one. ^__-
    Or, rather, I think you have the option to place it somewhere else in your "fantasy Earth". By the Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance, people in Europe still had a pretty fantastical view of what the other continents were like, didn't they? Maybe they're right. Maybe there's a realm somewhere in [the equivalent of] Asia or Africa, or in a completely made-up land on the other side of the world, which is appropriate to house all of the "weird fantasy" adventures which clash with your "fantasy Europe" aesthetics.
  • That's an interesting thought, Rafu. So far I've been sort of assuming that the "fantasy Earth" mostly has the same bits ours has, even if the geography is different. This is mostly relevant because I don't believe in re-setting adventure modules into different milieus, so if I want to run one of the popular alternative milieus like say fantasy Egypt, then I roughly know how to go about that: there is a fantasy Egypt in the world somewhere, probably at mediocre distance from fantasy Europe, and that's where all these Egyptian-flavoured D&D scenarios go. My technique in running the game world relies a lot on "macro-scale realism" related to cultural and economic history (as opposed to obsessing about nuances of e.g. medieval weaponry), so I need to know roughly what the unmentioned trade relations, accumulated geographical knowledges and so on are between the different parts of the world.

    Of course, nothing would prevent one from assuming that there are also Hyberborean places in the world, somewhere distant where they don't impact on the fantasy Europe we've been exploring. In fact, the classical choice would be to set that stuff inside the Earth: I could totally see a Burroughs-style lost world within, one that would be simultaneously distant (in the sense of having no contact with the surface outside exceptional circumstances) and nearby (for the purposes of e.g. travelling there).

    Actually, an inner Earth makes perfect sense as a sort of halfway point between "an exotic distant land" and "a different world". I've got adventure material in my line-up that I don't want to break out of its planar context (the aforementioned Fomalhaut, for instance - Gabor Lux has just done too much work with the setting on the pages of Fight On for me to just pick individual adventures and use them separately), but there are also some things that don't really have much of an overriding setting context but do have a strong sword & sorcery flavour. The Charnel Crypt of the Sightless Serpent, for instance; absolutely of highest quality as an adventure both technically and in flavour, but I don't want to run it in the current campaign milieu because it's so perfect for a slightly more fantastic world. A decadent and uncivilized Hyberborean world within the world would work well to position that sort of stuff.

    Of course, from the viewpoint of practical campaigning there is not that much difference between "a different planet", "a different dimension" and "a secret world hidden within the Earth". It's not like I don't give the players tools for travelling between worlds. It's not practically too much more difficult to travel from Earth to Carcosa than it is to travel from fantasy Amsterdam to fantasy Beijing, provided you know the ways. The key point is that such a major shift of milieu is, indeed, a change in milieu: it's a discrete event in the campaign, not something that would ordinarily happen as the result of some random hex-crawling. Certainly not something that non-player characters engage in routinely. In this regard these multiple possible settings, while technically accessible from each other, do not proffer immediate support between them in the same way events within one setting can be used in weaving further events. In a very real sense what happens in one world will only rarely affect what happens in another.

    But anyway, good call - definitely food for thought. Doesn't solve the immediate issue, as I can't combine the adventure material I have for different milieus even if those milieus are technically reachable by long-distance travel within the setting. But then, that problem was already solved by Gregor, above: I'm finding plenty of adventures I haven't seen before by following the links from Zak's blog. I wonder if anybody's done more trawling for this stuff since last summer?
  • edited March 2012
    I got everything on that list on my blog from James at the Underdark Gazette who now resides at Dreams of Mythic Fantasy.

    The most interesting thing I've seen (and been part of, so caveat) since then is available in its latest incarnation here.

    Though, dude, after 67 sessions--why not write your own?

    I mean, I know I know it's an "exploration of module D&D" but Seriously? 67 sessions?
  • Yeah, it's close to being my longest-running campaign of anything by session count already, even as it's only a year old now. Amazingly vivacious, especially if you remember that I come from a very '90s tradition of not being able to play anything at all for ten sessions straight.

    My main reason for not writing my own stuff is that I already write rpg stuff in my day job, such as it is. I tend to get pretty deep into my writing, so I'd rather not go to that mind-space right now on something that's strictly for fun. Perhaps in the summer, if I ever get this current thing I'm working on finished. Probably start a new campaign setting if I do that, though - the peculiar patchwork quality of this one appeals specifically because it's stitched together from so many sources. I'd surely do something more stylistically controlled if I controlled all the content from start to finish myself.

    Also, I have to admit that Jim Raggi has a point about the creative benefits of running adventures written by other people. The creative friction in retrofitting new things onto an ongoing campaign is kind of fun, and obviously enough I'll end up running lots of things that are nothing like what I'd do if I did everything myself. I'm by no measure a D&D man, so running adventures written by other people also helps me get a sense for what is considered commonplace and standard for the form.
  • Posted By: Eero Tuovinen I'm by no measure a D&D man, so running adventures written by other people also helps me get a sense for what is considered commonplace and standard for the form.
    See, I find that terrifying: that people who don't know D&D piece together how they think it should run from modules. It's like learning how to cook from TV dinners. No wonder people get traumatized by this game and have all these weird stereotypes about it--they think "three owlbears next to a room with a hydra in it" is actually what we've been doing all this time.
  • Posted By: Eero TuovinenOf course, from the viewpoint of practical campaigning there is not that much difference between "a different planet", "a different dimension" and "a secret world hidden within the Earth". It's not like I don't give the players tools for travelling between worlds. It's not practically too much more difficult to travel from Earth to Carcosa than it is to travel from fantasy Amsterdam to fantasy Beijing, provided you know the ways. The key point is that such a major shift of milieu is, indeed, a change in milieu: it's a discrete event in the campaign, not something that would ordinarily happen as the result of some random hex-crawling. Certainly not something that non-player characters engage in routinely. In this regard these multiple possible settings, while technically accessible from each other, do not proffer immediate support between them in the same way events within one setting can be used in weaving further events. In a very real sense what happens in one world will only rarely affect what happens in another.
    Let's not forget that, if you're going "hollow earth", then a "gateway" between the two worlds - interior and exterior - can literally be a deep hole anywhere: in a random hex, or at the bottom level of any dungeon. Being material and not magical, I think there are more opportunities for things good or bad to cross it.
    Posted By: Zak SSee, I find that terrifying: that people who don't know D&D piece together how they think it should run frommodules.
    Zak, do you think there are better teaching texts? I sure as hell got a better feel for how to write a 3E dungeon, for example, after I started reading 3E dungeons created by other people, especially 3E Dungeon magazine. And some 15 years before, it was the example (half-)dungeon included in the "Red Box" which got me started with role-playing games at all. Are you advocating word-of-mouth and living example as the only appropriate teaching method for D&D, maybe?
  • Yes, cargo cult roleplaying is a big problem for the entire form. I mean, I should know - I started roleplaying purely from game texts, we taught ourselves from the ground up on the basis of a half dozen game texts at first, long before the Internet was a public and useful thing. (And fuck me if our oeuvre of games was not in some ways entirely insane - I imagine that most people can't claim that their first two roleplaying games were Twilight 2000 and 2300 AD at 12-year old.) I did not interact routinely with gamers outside our group before everybody'd long since stopped playing and I myself moved down to Helsinki for college. I definitely agree that it's easy to get all sorts of weird ideas about games in that sort of environment where you don't learn a complex game from wiser mentors.

    Today, though, and with D&D, I think I've got this thing pretty well in hand. For one thing, I've grown wise in my old days, and am now able to interpret what I read, and enact abstract structures reasonable into reality. I know that my D&D is going swimmingly because it's fun, and because I can pinpoint the same features that others write about when people bother to write about actual play technique instead of ancillary concerns. Ultimately I'm doing well with D&D because I took the time to figure out for myself what I wanted to do with it before going and doing it, so I'm more of a co-designer of this entire exercise than a hapless victim of a game text. Took years, of course.

    Using adventure modules has been all sorts of educational for me over the last year. For example, I'd never stopped to notice before that D&D has a pretty standard low-level monster taxonomy that everybody seems to recycle in low-level adventures. I guess I'd sort of thought that people pick monsters carefully on the basis of some I don't know, setting vision or something, but actually they mostly all come from some old D&D monster manual section of low-level monsters. So that is why our adventurers are constantly stumbling on goblins, for example - almost every adventure author I use in the campaign puts some goblins in there, that's just what a typical 1st level dungeon or the 1st level of a multi-level dungeon apparently needs. It's a style thing, I imagine.

    OK, so that's a pretty humble sort of revelation, but there's lots of small stuff like this in here. I wouldn't understand this whole slime/ooze/jelly thing half as a well without the long-term module-based campaign; it's not like I'd ever end up using the Labyrinth Lord monster listings by myself, if I wrote my own adventures. It's like mystery archeology about things that I've only been aware of in the abstract and second-hand forms (computer games, say) before.

    Also, I should say that the D&D adventure location module is not nearly as bad as a misleading game text as a properly "middle-school" traditional plotted adventure can be. In fact, I find that the location-based adventure spec in a D&D module is very useful: it makes running the game creatively effortless while also making it easy for the GM to keep a tight discipline on himself about being objective. It's easier to do lax prep and/or biased improvisation if you don't have a basic structure to work with, and I've found that the standard dungeon scheme works very well in this regard. I'd probably strive for a very similar level of rigour if I prepared my adventures myself. This makes the D&D dungeon prep a truly unique adventure text: I've read a lot of different roleplaying game texts, and as far as I know the D&D dungeon is the only adventure module format that is actually useful and genuinely beneficial for playing the game. We have an entire history of commercial adventure modules, and most of them are horrible, railroaded trash, but the old school dungeon module doesn't belong in this category in my mind. (I should clarify that the same authors who've written good dungeon adventures have created awfully dysfunctional plotted adventures; it's not about the authors, but about the format - the string-of-scenes model just doesn't cut it as an useful tool for non-railroading gameplay, I think.)

    Some people might remember some Forge discussions from 2004 or so, related to adventure writing. The Heroquest scenario... Well of Souls(?) was written around then to sketch out some possible ways of achieving an actually functional plot-heavy adventure spec format without relying on "after this happens have this other thing happen". It's illustrative to compare these modern attempts at breaking the vicious cycle with the oldest adventure format of them all. Considering this and the likes of Trail of Cthulhu, which also in their own way try to make the plotted adventure work, we might see generally better adventure modules in the future outside the dungeoneering genre, too.
  • Posted By: Rafu
    Let's not forget that, if you're going "hollow earth", then a "gateway" between the two worlds - interior and exterior - can literally be a deep hole anywhere: in a random hex, or at the bottom level of any dungeon. Being material and not magical, I think there are more opportunities for things good or bad to cross it.
    Oh, definitely! In fact, it seems obvious that the "hollow earth" works in an exciting way if I just presume that any dungeon that goes deep enough will ultimately surface there. This makes the underground dungeon environment itself a gateway between the worlds, which is one more reason to go risk your life there. I already work with the "underground wilderness" in this way - the Darkness Beneath from Fight On involves a very exciting "Underdark" environment that I'm using as an end-point for other, unrelated underground rivers and such, sort of assuming that dungeons that seem separate above-ground will, should they descent sufficiently, sooner or later cross each other in the underwilds. It would be natural to assume that as many tunnels descend into the underwilds, so likewise many tunnels continue even further, ultimately emerging into the interior Earth. And that's just in fantasy-Bavaria, where the Darkness Beneath lies - there are other dungeons elsewhere that also make for credible hollow Earth entrances.

    Of course, it also makes sense to have some "easier" routes between the inner and outer worlds, as descending a megadungeon is not exactly a minor prelude to planar adventure. I'm pretty sure that the Weird New World (Raggi's polar-themed sandbox that I'm using as the ultima thule of the campaign continent) probably has a few entrances into the interior; polar conditions just somehow fit traditionally with tropical inner realms.

    Hmm, I wonder how the Geoffrey Dale module Inferno works with this. (I got inspired to investigate this from the Fight On article a while back.) I've been thinking that I'll plop it down in fantasy-Italy, as that seems to be where a particular player's mercenary troop is going to this spring. Dante's Inferno involves dark underground tunnels that begin at the lowest level and penetrate the Earth (coming out on the Purgatory mountain, as we know), so it's a pretty natural assumption that these same tunnels cross with the "hollow earth". Nice twist for any character who somehow ends up following Dante's footsteps.

    Not that I expect players to penetrate Inferno, that would be crazy. They would need some clever leverage, akin to what Dante had. Not likely that this campaign sees power-levels sufficient for actually raiding the place, the way we're going. The players were in enough difficulty with Voldemort from Insidious.
  • I'd start by looking over the past entries in the One Page Dungeon Competition. Maybe string a few together.
  • Posted By: Eero Tuovinen
    Using adventure modules has been all sorts of educational for me over the last year. For example, I'd never stopped to notice before that D&D has a pretty standard low-level monster taxonomy that everybody seems to recycle in low-level adventures. I guess I'd sort of thought that people pick monsters carefully on the basis of some I don't know, setting vision or something,
    I understand why "what whoever buys modules does" is of possible purely academic interest but I don't understand why this is helpful in actually running games. Monsters should be chosen carefully based on setting vision--why would knowing that you can sell rubes KoboldGoblinOrcHobgoblinInThatOrder help you run a good game?

    It's like an education in what not to do.
  • Eero, I have only recently discovered a love of premade modules in the last year or so. I tried running Glorantha and spinning my own yarns and found it to be incredibly overwhelming and intimidating. My campaign floundered and then died. A parallel campaign I was running simultaneously out of premade modules was extremely successful though. Letting other people do the prep work while I got my confidence and familiarity with the setting and how the game should go was very educational.

    I don't have any good free module suggestions, but I am enjoying the benefits of your thread!
  • Posted By: Zak SPosted By: Eero Tuovinen
    Using adventure modules has been all sorts of educational for me over the last year. For example, I'd never stopped to notice before that D&D has a pretty standard low-level monster taxonomy that everybody seems to recycle in low-level adventures. I guess I'd sort of thought that people pick monsters carefully on the basis of some I don't know, setting vision or something,
    I understand why "what whoever buys modules does" is of possible purely academic interest but I don't understand why this is helpful in actually running games. Monstersshouldbe chosen carefully based on setting vision--why would knowing that you can sell rubes KoboldGoblinOrcHobgoblinInThatOrder help you run a good game?

    It's like an education in what not to do.

    Yeah this seems like madness to me. I mean, to an extent I figured out how to set up a D&D adventure from the likes of Keep on the Borderlands but what I took away from it was "ah, there are caves and you can pick which cave and there are tunnels between and the monsters in each are pissed off at each other plus there's a guy with an agenda and oh yeah your players may just want to rob the castle" not "Orc then Hobgoblin then Gnoll is the correct arrangement, do not deviate."

    I mean if I buy a shelving unit the instructions show a guy in a cardigan and dockers assembling it but it never would occur to me to put on a cardigan and dockers to assemble the shelf.

    Maybe I was just a weird kid but I pretty much saw Orcs as placeholders and was pretty quick to trade them out for devil-guys and serpent people and weird bug-,men who like to ask riddles.
  • Guys, I'm not saying that I've learned that I should put goblins in my adventures. I've learned that this seems to be a common thing to do. I'm learning from the wisdom of the ancients here, but of course not everything is directly applicable or even useful. I'm reserving judgment, though, as I might not know the things these people did when writing these adventures.
  • Eero - and from your play reports you said than when you're putting goblins in your adventure you're not putting goblins in your adventure, but a kind of humans called "goblins" so already your monster choices are decided for your setting in part.

    I think the repeated use of the goblin-orc hierarchy was in the 70s-80s part portability among campaigns and part "it's designed for the setting, but the design of the settng is kinda lazy."

    In 21st century D&D products it seems to be more about branding and iconicity - "ORCS SAY D&Dtm"
  • Posted By: Eero TuovinenGuys, I'm not saying that I've learned that I should put goblins in my adventures. I've learned that this seems to be a common thing to do. I'm learning from the wisdom of the ancients here, but of course not everything is directly applicable or even useful. I'm reserving judgment, though, as I might not know the things these people did when writing these adventures.
    Absolutely essential advice for anyone running module D&D:

    Play a Google + game with Jeff RIents of Jeff's Gameblog as a DM. He will show exactly how you take a featureless, flavorless, next-room-next-monster dungeon and turn it into fine art by GMing.
  • Posted By: Zak SPosted By: Eero TuovinenGuys, I'm not saying that I've learned that I should put goblins in my adventures. I've learned that this seems to be a common thing to do. I'm learning from the wisdom of the ancients here, but of course not everything is directly applicable or even useful. I'm reserving judgment, though, as I might not know the things these people did when writing these adventures.
    Absolutely essential advice for anyone running module D&D:

    Play a Google + game with Jeff RIents of Jeff's Gameblog as a DM. He will show exactly how you take a featureless, flavorless, next-room-next-monster dungeon and turn it into fine art by GMing.

    I'm going to repeat this, because it bears repeating.
  • Not a bad idea. I'll have to get into the Goole+ rounds one of these days, especially if this online gaming thing pans out long-term. Have to get a web camera and a better microphone, though.
  • Posted By: Eero TuovinenNot a bad idea. I'll have to get into the Goole+ rounds one of these days, especially if this online gaming thing pans out long-term. Have to get a web camera and a better microphone, though.
    It's worth the investment. I have played with a lot of really great DMs on G+ in the past few months.
  • I've heard that it's the bee's knees! I'd be there yesterday already if I didn't have crazies banging at my door three times a week to play in person.

    The good sort of crazies, I mean, the sort that I know in advance and all. Wouldn't be so good otherwise.
  • Eero,you could run the two campaigns a few hundred r thousand years apart in the same locations. You can have fun getting the two fictions inform one another across time.
  • Posted By: ivanEero,you could run the two campaigns a few hundred r thousand years apart in the same locations. You can have fun getting the two fictions inform one another across time.
    Another fun idea. I'll have to keep this in mind. Would be especially cool to throw down perhaps the best OSR product of them all, the Anomalous Subsurface Environment. The setting described therein would be pretty perfect as the future condition of your average low-fantasy semi-historical world like ours.

    For now I'm settling on starting the new stuff just a week's journey (on foot, no less) from some pretty regular stomping grounds of the tabletop team. It's close enough that some of the adventures I'm offering to the players are the same stuff the tabletop team has passed on in the past, but far enough that the teams are probably not going to cross each other right away. I've got The Thing in the Valley (I reread it, and it's actually hooked for proactive party entry - I don't know why I remembered that it's set up as "you stumble on this village while travelling"), Courtyard of Gerald the Red and Under Xylarthen's Tower set up as my centerpiece attractions, and I have a few other pieces waiting on the sidelines for random encounters and red herrings. I'm sure that players who are passingly familiar with the proceedings of the tabletop game will appreciate the insider references. Also, I'll be pestering the PCs to join the West Indies Trading Company for some colonial adventures outside the local sandbox. Good enough for now, as this style of play is very friendly towards piece-by-piece building.
  • Posted By: RogerI'd start by looking over the past entries in the One Page Dungeon Competition. Maybe string a few together.
    Can I second this? There are some incredible ideas in those entries and I've been looking at several of them as stand alone adventures for D&D 4E (but they would work for almost any system).
  • I'll have to look at the one-page dungeons. The one-page dungeons in Fight On have been a bit difficult to incorporate efficiently; on the one hand I know that I have a bunch of them lying about, but on the other they're difficult to find when I need them, and I'd really need to make some lists or something so I'd remember their existence when appropriate. Usability is such a surprisingly important thing for an adventure to even get to the fore. The few that I've used have been pretty appropriately sized for adventuring, though.
  • I've run a bunch of One Page Dungeons with my Basic D&D group. They are excellent. It only takes me a few minutes to determine if I like one or not, a few more minutes to read, and then they are really easy to reference in play.
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