Tenra. Guys.

2

Comments

  • Every link to the files in the two emails I got from Andy, including the dropbox link, is down/blocked for exceeding the traffic limit T_T
  • @Andy releasing big files is a hassle... may I suggest, for the final release, to use a torrent?

    That way instead of clogging completely your host, the crowd downloading will actually help the speed of release. I suppose you could send privately the files beforehand to some willing buddies that will keep the seeds open for a while... or maybe there's some free service online to do so?

    I think I can contribute some kilobytes of upload bandwidth if you need 'em. Let me know :)
  • edited October 2012
    Good problems to have, shows interest. Going the torrent route sounds like a good idea. I know I would help host the files for a while as long as the configuration/instructions were dirt simple. I've played around with them, but I am no guru. Eclipse Phase, another large download IIRC, benefited from that technology.
    --
    TAZ
  • edited October 2012
    Eh, this pre-final version I may set up a torrent for it later, but for the final version I'll be doing direct link only (because I can't "turn a torrent off" once there are new complete file seeders). Between dropbox (I'll upgrade to be a paid user for a month) and 1-2 other sites (including my own) it should work, especially since the final files will compress a lot further.

    -Andy
  • Managed to download it at last (thanks to the extra link Andy promptly provided). :-)
    I just skimmed through the files for now (digesting the whole thing is gonna take a while) but yes it's HUGE and made of awesome. You've really done a terrific job, Andy!
  • I'm glad to report that after about a decade of waiting for this game, reading it is not anticlimactic at all! Haven't gotten to the rules yet, but the setting book is like an internally consistent version of Rifts, though that damns it with faint praise.

    Not sure I would have spotted the X-Men homage if Andy hadn't mentioned it long ago! Some are more obfuscated than others, but I am shocked that Maggott of all characters made it in.
  • I am working my way through it and I am loving it so far. It is a seriously amazing RPG. However, I am too engrossed to comment on specifics :)
  • I'm just gonna chill and wait for my print copies, 700 megs is a lot for me to chug through. :)
  • Yeah, I'm getting a pretty good "what I thought Exalted would be like" vibe off it too.

    The setting book is uh...daunting. And off the hook insane.
  • edited October 2012
    Pure awesome-sauce.

    Though the PDF is making Adobe work hella hard. I'd actually recommend MuPDF for those who are experiencing slowness (or just have a less powerful PC). Less features, but it renders super-fast, even on slower machines (IME).
  • Yeah, if nothing else, if it's just too slow, wait a few weeks and the final version (with better graphics and smaller file size) will be available.
  • edited October 2012
    I could wait...

    ...but I'm way too excited. I haven't geeked out over an RPG like this in a long time.
  • Luke, you didn't take the day off work just to read the pdfs, did you?
  • I'm now wondering whether the Terminator quote was intentional :)
  • Finished the setting book, getting into the rules now. This game was easily about a decade ahead of its time; most of the stuff in here would have been totally mind-blowing had I seen it in '97-2000. As is, it is "merely" an appealingly modern design that seems to be right in my sweet spot for crunchiness. The Aiki-Kiai-Karma-Fate economy is still pretty amazing, it's like the BW Artha system combined with Solar System's Transcendence, optimized so you don't have to wait multiple sessions for dramatic, character-changing developments to kick in. Can't wait to kick the tires on this!
  • edited October 2012
    Luke, you didn't take the day off work just to read the pdfs, did you?
    Its school holidays at the moment, so I can get more reading of gaming PDFs done at work :)

    Just to repeat what Joe says, this RPG feels like my greatest hits of RPG mechanic from the last 15 years, only it was written 15 years ago. To quote Highlander: "... it [is] like discovering a 747 a thousand years before the Wright Brothers ever flew!" :D Honestly, it has my favourite mechanics from Exalted, Anima, The One Ring, Apocalypse World, Mouse Guard, Marvel Heroic, A Song of Fire and Ice often in a way that's improved. I am blown away.

  • Cool! Well, let's play it some time :)
  • edited October 2012
    Definitely. TBZ is one of the few RPG purchases I made with the intention of playing the living shit out of it.

    You bring the sake and I will hire an old man to play a biwa.

  • I'm now wondering whether the Terminator quote was intentional :)
    Which one?

    There's lots of easter eggs in this thing, from Kamen Rider to Star Wars to the X-Men, and so on!

    It's also great to hear that people are looking to run it. Currently, when I'm not spending hours after work on this Tenra project management stuff, I'm enjoying the shit out of reading Night's Black Agents, one of the first big book RPGs in AGES that I'm reading cover to cover instead of jumping straight to the "rules parts". I'm hoping to play it in the next month or so...

    -Andy
  • edited October 2012
    It's also great to hear that people are looking to run it. Currently, when I'm not spending hours after work on this Tenra project management stuff, I'm enjoying the shit out of reading Night's Black Agents, one of the first big book RPGs in AGES that I'm reading cover to cover instead of jumping straight to the "rules parts". I'm hoping to play it in the next month or so...
    Nice. I'm looking forward to NBA myself, but I swore off buying more GUMSHOE games because I keep buying them and not playing them. I'm sure I won't be able to resist Ken Hite for much longer though.

    I'm more or less done reading Tenra! It looks gooood. I'm particularly impressed by how surprisingly well-thought-out the setting is as a place to be gamed in; lots of plot hooks and suggestive allusions everywhere, and just enough structure in place to riff off of without reaching a critical mass of canon that feels like homework. The GMing advice looks really immediately useful too.

    My one complaint is that these PDFs are so huge and multi-layered that they keep crashing my printer (and even the PDF reader on my Kindle while I was reading it!). I mean, I'm glad I got to read it before the new year, but I'm going to try running it in a few days and I kind of need to print some of it out. I barely managed to print out the "how to play" comics and Emotion Matrix, so I don't need to work up a cheat sheet, but I guess we're all going to have to pass my Kindle around and copy out the sample characters by hand. Even the official character sheet on the website is a little too fancy to print easily. On the other hand, it does have the Fate costs on it-- very handy!
  • I'm now wondering whether the Terminator quote was intentional :)
    Which one?
    Ha! Ok. I will keep an eye out for more. I meant the one in the initial Kongohki description. I'm in the middle of a house move so unfortunately didn't have much time to read through the PDFs yet.
  • edited October 2012
    So yesterday I played in a game of TBZ on IRC, and it was an absolute blast! This was my first time playing an RPG (as opposed to GMing one) in almost a decade. The GM and other players were great, which obviously played a part in why I had so much fun, but I think the excellence of the game itself was definitely a big factor, as well. :)

    I played Hichiro, an old, retired Armour Hunter whose beloved grandfather had been killed in front of him by an Armour Rider that went asura. Another player ran Hanbei, my character's young and naive apprentice who wants to track down information about (and follow in the footsteps of) his long-lost father, who was a legendary hero. Rounding out the party was Sister Kyoko, a tough-as-nails street thug-turned-Buddhist Monk who thinks busting heads can be an excellent method for teaching people about Non-Attachment.

    I felt that the Zero Act at the beginning of the game was a brilliant concept, as it really helped bring the characters to life and get us all in the mood and into the swing of things. I went first, recounting the story of the day that Hichiro's grandfather was murdered; Kyoko's player and the GM acted out her first encounter with the man whose battle prowess inspired her to go into the cloister; and Hanbei's player and I acted out the story of our characters' first meeting. It was great fun all around. :)

    After that we went on to Act One, where the three of us first met each other during an audience with a local lord who offered us a reward for bringing him the head (metaphorically speaking) of another, rival lord. The mechanic where you roll to see your character's first impression of an NPC (and the fact that you can spend points to change the result) was cool, and I'm looking forward to seeing more of that in action during our next game. (The aiki chits stuff was also awesome, especially from the perspective of someone like me who hasn't played games with similar mechanics before.)

    Our session ended with a battle on the road to the rival warlord's city, which was hilariously awesome. We all went full-out on the anime/JRPG flavor: calling out our opponents before battle, making (not-so-)witty taunts and quips, etc. The whole experience did my heart proud. :)

    Anyway, to sum things up, I'd give TBZ 5 out of 5 stars, and it's definitely going on my "to buy" list along with Microscope. Thank you, Andy, for bringing this awesome game to American shores! :)
  • Cool story, Anduwaithe. I am still working my way through the books (half way now :) ) but I am more impressed by this game the farther I get :)
  • I'm most of the way through the rules now and I think, despite the gear porn and trad-looking resolution system, many (most?) story-gamer types are gonna be right at home with the underlying incentives-driven play. There's a very nice reward cycle for pushing the melodrama, then being awesome, and then burning out (or making hard choices that keep you from burning out).
  • For those interested in seeing a rough break down of the RPG, I wrote this over on the RPGSite:

    On Sunday, the pre-release PDFs for Tenra Bansho Zero were released to allow for a week or so of editing by eagle eyed fans, before the final PDFs are released and sent to print. I am about 50% the way through the RPG, so I can't comment on the RPG as a whole just yet. But these are my impressions so far.

    The RPG is a big game at 700 pages (though with graphic novel sized pages). That makes it sound like the game is complex but its not. The added pages come from a number of factors:

    - There is a reasonable amount of repetition in the text. This has been of considerable benefit from a first read through as the game is well explained at all times with little need to cross reference, but it may reduce in benefit over time.

    - There is lots of game aids, something I wish more RPGs would do. The books include full page manga examples of the mechanics, a 5 page player handout introduction, a list of 222 things to throw into a game, a huge list of in setting names, a section on the game's inspirations.

    - Each character archetype is detailed in around 20 to 30 pages (setting and mechanics) and there are over 10 archetypes. One of the best things is that there are three approaches to PC creation. The first is sample characters (almost prebuilt PCs for each archetype), the second is archetypes (these allow PCs to be made by combining 2 to 4 smaller archetypes) and the third is from scratch.

    The RPG consists of the 5 main parts (all but one being roughly of similar size):

    - Rules
    - Karma/Fate/Game Structure
    - Setting (though a lot is also contained in the Character section)
    - Game Aids
    - Characters (this is roughly the same size as the other 4 parts combined)

    The Rules section is a simplified White Wolf style system, with attributes and skills, HP (Vitality) and Wound Levels. The combat system is equally simple and straightforward with some real gems such as:

    - the reverse death spiral and the handling of character death
    - worthwhile miscellaneous combat actions

    The Karma/Fate/Game Structure section consists of two parts. The first is that each PC has a list of Fates, which represent things important to the PC. These generate bennies called Aiki Chits that can be spent like both XP and action points. When spent they produce Karma, and when you reach 108 Karma, your PC falls to the dark side. You can prevent this by removing Fates, Buddhist style.

    The game has a default structure, though it is a relatively conventional one. First, there is PC creation. Then the PCs have preludes to establish the PCs and the scenario. Then the game alternates between Acts (where you roleplay) and Intermissions (downtime where you spend XP and adjust your PC). Fates and Karma are dealt with during the Intermission. Given that 108 Karma provides a cap on PC power, most TBZ games are designed to be played out in around 6 hours, though you can easily string games together as you do any RPG, though you may need to redesign your PC some between each game.

    One element that is interesting is the Emotion Matrix. Effectively, given the shorter than normal expected game length the RPG creates a default impression for PCs to any major NPC they met. This is generated randomly on a random. Effectively the matrix assumes that there is already some history, relationship or impression there. This initial emotion can be changed quickly but the idea is to spark roleplaying from first and often less explicable initial impressions. This element of the game may be removed in its entirety without a hassle.

    The Setting is what it says on the box. It has all the grittiness of historical Japan in the Sengoku Era mixed with the hyper reality of anime and manga. Ashigaru warriors, shinto priests, onmyoji and feudal lords stand side by side with mecha, cybernetics, spirit animals and flying battleships. There is a good overview of the setting with some astute insights into Japanese medieval life. But it is also open for each game to drop an entire kingdom of their own devising into.

    The Game Aids are an array of excellent aids to get one started. Full page manga comics explaining the rules, lists of names, a introduction handout, sample characters, a sample kingdom, lists of things to do, and a section on inspiration.

    The Characters take up almost half of the book, along with the three types of PC creation. You can play normal humans (even amazingly competent ones) in Tenra Bansho Zero and there are even many different normal human archetypes in the second style of PC creation. However, the most page space, due to their special abilities, goes to the various usual archetype which have their own set of rules and setting. Despite the seeming diversity, none are too complex, spinning off the simple core mechanics.

    The character archetypes include:
    - Armour Riders - both Evangelion style and normal mecha
    - Onmyoji - wizards
    - Samurai - spirit infused warriors
    - Buddhist monks - different schools
    - Kijin - cyber-warriors
    - Kongohki - war-golems
    - Shinobi - ninja
    - Kugutsu - living dolls
    - Annelidists - symbiotic worm infestation weirdness
    - Oni - spiritual first people
    - Shinto Priests - the Illuminati
    - Ayakashi - spirit animals

    There is also an Arts of War section detailing special schools of warrior training.
  • Anduwaithe & Skywalker - thanks for those posts!
    I've been playing with the pdf size and trying to reduce it to something manageable and printable. I got the first section of each book printed so I have something to read until I can get it rockin' on the Kindle.
  • I printed off the following as a primer for my players in my group:

    - Colour manga setting pages
    - The 5 page introduction to Tenra
    - The manga examples of the Rules
    - Colour manga character type pages
    - Sample Characters

    It seems to give a good overview of the game and is easy to digest due to the visual presentation.
  • I ran Tenra last night! We started way too late, so we used pregens and only made it through one scene after the Zero Act, but it was a doozy and this writeup will be long.

    Our cast included a self-hating Shinobi, a lusty Buddhist Nun, and an emotionally blank Kugutsu. We had an Armour Rider too, but his player had to leave after the Zero Act.

    In the Zero Act, we discovered:

    The Shinobi hates himself for the things his clan makes him do. The worst mission he'd yet been sent on was to end a politically inconvenient affair by the Regent's son-- by killing the woman. Her last request was to beg the Shinobi to tell her lover she died peacefully, loving him. He sought out the young lord, but couldn't bring himself to tell this shallow, privileged brat anything to make his heart lighter. The Emotion Matrix came up Chains of Fate-- the Shinobi was destined to keep encountering this infuriating boor, and was inspired to pick up a new Fate with him as an Enemy.

    The Nun was an orphan, left at the local Ebon Mountain temple (more accurately described as "a cave the local monk meditates in") and more or less raised as the monk's daughter. Her natural inclinations are quite unpriestly, and she falls in and out of love easily with the local lads. Her big scene was a farce, with her in the bed of her latest amor, with her master battering down the door like something out of the Shining. She attemped to flee out the window, but only made it halfway through before the head monk broke through, loudly lamenting his failures as a parent, teacher, and priest, begging the Buddha's forgiveness for ruining this young woman through his own incompentence. This did make her feel quite guilty and unsettled, as the master's lectures often did (Emotion Matrix: Shock)... but not guilty enough to give up the search for true love (her new Fate).

    The Kugutsu was raised unaware of her true nature, sheltered from society in the quiet, isolated mansion of her father/creator, her only company 108 small clockwork dolls that all bore her face. Then one day, her father finally brought her a visitor... a woman who also shared her same face. Raving insanely, with fires of rage in his eyes (Emotion Matrix: Hatred), her "father" explained that she was the perfect, refined and educated replacement for this gross beast of flesh who had dared reject him so many years ago. And now she was finally ready to take her place and earn her creator's love at long last, by raising her blade and striking down her original. The obedient Kugutsu drew her blade and advanced, soothing her victim with soft words... words that drew her into the Butterfly Dream. In that secret, sacred place, she spoke earnestly with her template, and understood that the purpose she had been raised for was wrong. The Dream dispersed, she cut the ropes binding the prisoner and fled into the night with her new "sister", hand in hand. She then took a Fate along the lines of "protect my sister".

    And the Armour Rider's big debut as a pilot was a festive affair attended by the nobility of a neighboring province; a joust of sorts against a scion of that Regent. After some taunting by his opponent, the Rider lunged forward and cleanly severed the enemy armour's sword arm in one stroke... but then, egged on by the malevolent disembodied voice of his own armour (an offhand comment by the Shinobi's player, who got pelted with Aiki), was overwhelmed with bloodlust and slew the pilot.

    So that was all really awesome, but I was actually kind of stumped for how to bind this motley crew together, much less how to elegantly work them into the plot seed I'd been considering. Instead of assigning Destinies right off, I decided to punt and ask the group for input. After a few Emotion Matrix rolls between the remaining three characters, we decided that the Shinobi was the long-lost brother of the Buddhist Nun (she was left with priests, he with a regent that handed off the child to be trained as a ninja) and that the Kugutsu and her "sister" were travelers seeking asylum at the Nun's "temple". The Nun didn't pay much notice to the Kugutsu, but the Shinobi could tell she wasn't what she seemed... no mere traveling entertainer had that air of someone trained to kill.

    So given all that, we tied together the Nun's famously amorous nature with the Shinobi's backstory-- he, in disguise, had filled the regent's son's ear with tales of the beautiful nun who lived alone on the mountain, to draw him into another unwise affair that would hopefully bring him public shame. The scene was set, an extremely awkward meal of humble fare in the temple-cave, the senior monk extremely uncomfortable with being host to so many people, especially someone so politically important. After briefly supervising the grace, he left the gathering in the hands of his disciple and went to meditate.

    As soon as he left, the young lord and the Nun were all over each other, flirting like mad. In short order they were cozy enough to start looking for a private place he could "receive instruction", but the Kugutsu's utter innocence and lack of social grace led her to make some severely unwise comments. The lord, unamused, tried to stare her down by mentioning he would be fully within the rights of his station to kill her where she stood for such insolence, and when she refused to beg his forgiveness, he drew his blade and struck.

    A tremendous mistake on his part-- she was far more skilled than he and riposted. The Nun attempted to intervene and calm everyone down (a three-way opposed roll of Body: Melee Weapons vs Body: Melee Weapons vs Empathy: Persuasion) but the Kugutsu's lightning sword lashed out. The Nun spent Kiai to defend the lord, and the Shinobi spent Kiai to defend her, taking some Heavy Wounds. The lord began to leave, swearing to return with his father's men to have them all crucified, but the Shinobi played on his wounded pride yet again ("Yes, go leave and beg your father's permission to avenge yourself") and provoked the lord into drawing steel again. The shinobi easily parried and struck deeply; the lord sat down heavily, blood streaming from his chest, life ebbing.

    The Kugutsu then drew him into the Butterfly Dream; a vision of himself dead, trapped in his own grave. Claiming to be the judge of the dead, she tried to tease out his motives and make him repent his sins, but he was resigned to the fate his karma had brought him and unashamed of the path that led him there. His one regret was that he died without ever ruling-- and she encouraged him to act on that desire, and overthrow his father!

    The Dream passed, and the Nun healed his wounds with prayer. Gravely, the lord bowed low before her, and declared that he had found enlightenment within this temple. He rose up, and left to embroil the province in civil war.

    And then the senior monk finally came to investigate all the noise. "Why is the floor covered in blood!?"

    By this point it was waaay too late, so I called an Intermission so they could get a taste of managing their Fates. Short Act, but they managed to completely destablize the politics of the region, so they got a lot done! We might pick up where we left off with these characters next week.
  • I feel weird for bringing this up because in my experience this series has a bad reputation, but Samurai 7 is SUPER excellent inspiration for Tenra visually. It has the whole 'Giant robots and crazy samurai but only in war' stuff, and other people in the world are still living in the style of feudal Japan. It even has people who replace their bodies with machine parts as a major aspect of the setting.
  • Samurai 7 is good visual inspiration but it's a bit pants as a series, especially towards its end :)

    I find that TBZ can draw inspiration from many many movies and TV shows (live action and anime) and manga. I personally recommend the French comic Okko for a close to the sample One Tenra of Many setting.
  • edited October 2012
    Yeah, most of the anime I can think of that partake in Tenra's particular kind of kitchen-sinkiness (Samurai 7, Samurai Girls, Horizon in the Middle of Nowhere) are honestly pretty awful, at least as far as the writing goes. But as Ken Hite says, bad media makes for good gaming, and most Hong Kong action movies aren't paragons of literary value either and Feng Shui remains a thumping good time.
  • Double posting to reiterate how much I love this game; it is just hitting everything I want
    out of gaming right now, all killer no filler. It has all the power fantasy of ninja fighting in mid-air stabbing each others' shadows with flying shuriken, and a focus on characters' internal lives that encourages quiet, private moments where a naive young bride tries to understand her deathly ill husband. Last night we had those two scenes happen back to back.
  • edited October 2012
    Man the pictures are blurry.

    What up with dat?
  • IIRC, the images need to be exported and imported in order to fix that. It's being worked on. The draft you have is not the final.
    --
    TAZ
  • Hey, sorry, was making a joke. My bad.
  • Double posting to reiterate how much I love this game; it is just hitting everything I want out of gaming right now, all killer no filler.
    Word.

  • edited October 2012
    [White Heat Palm fist-bump]
  • edited October 2012
    [Spike Punch high five]
  • [Flaming Black Lotus wedgie]
  • [itadakimasu]
  • edited October 2012
    [Four-and-a-half-pint death finger sac tap]
  • I've got my arms up and I'm giving you all my positive energy for this genkidama game of yours. By the way, I didn't get to back up the kickstarter, so I'm wondering if the PDF is gonna be on sale somewhere I can pay using paypal, in a near future.
  • I think Andy is planning to sell the PDF sometime after its KS release (still a few weeks away) and the print release (still a few months away).
  • Thanks to the gods of Tenra then, I'll wait impatiently.
  • Ran my third session of Tenra last night. Still loving this game.

    Last week we only had time for a couple scenes after the Zero Act, so we just used the same characters again this week. I didn't assign them another Destiny during this week's Zero Act, but one of the players deliberately raised his Fates higher than his Karma would allow since you don't do the Fate accounting during that intermission. When we hit the first full intermission I just ruled that he couldn't raise any of his Fates since he was already past the limit. I don't think it ended up being a big deal, but is there any actual guideline for this situation, or is it just a niggling edge case not worth worrying about?
  • @Joe_McGuffin : Interesting. That player must have been playing a Kongohki, correct? because that's the only character type (starting out with a rank-five Fate) that can possibly go over the karma/fate limit in the first act (unless you have a super-super-super low starting karma character, perhaps?).

    That's an edge case, I think. Technically, you should be doing that Fate Math each intermission (including the first), but since only the Kongohki can ever possibly break that limit in the zero act intermission, it's never really come up. I think your handling of it is fine.

    -Andy
  • Interesting. That player must have been playing a Kongohki, correct? because that's the only character type (starting out with a rank-five Fate) that can possibly go over the karma/fate limit in the first act (unless you have a super-super-super low starting karma character, perhaps?).
    Actually he was our Annelidist. I didn't check his math, but it seemed reasonable to me since he'd had three chances to raise all his Fates at that point (last week's Zero Act + Intermission, then this week's Zero Act).

    That's an edge case, I think. Technically, you should be doing that Fate Math each intermission (including the first), but since only the Kongohki can ever possibly break that limit in the zero act intermission, it's never really come up. I think your handling of it is fine.
    Groovy. I wasn't expecting it to come up often.
  • Ah, so you basically had a full game session last time (complete to the end of the story), then they reused the same character with the same fates in this session for this new story, then?

    Ahh, yeah in that case they should then balance those fates even in the Zero Act. Sorry, I didn't think to add that as an addendum. LMK how multiple-story-with-same-characters goes, I'm interested in hearing more stories about that.

    Thanks!
    -Andy
  • edited October 2012
    Ah, so you basically had a full game session last time (complete to the end of the story), then they reused the same character with the same fates in this session for this new story, then?
    Close enough. We didn't finish the story completely, but we had a huge amount of forward motion and ended on a really dramatically satisfying scene that paid off a bunch of emotional and character beats (and prompted a few Fate rewrites) so I thought it seemed "done enough" for one session. Not so much the end of a story, but the end of the first book or movie in a series?

    Ahh, yeah in that case they should then balance those fates even in the Zero Act. Sorry, I didn't think to add that as an addendum. LMK how multiple-story-with-same-characters goes, I'm interested in hearing more stories about that.
    Will do! Not sure when that'll happen next, since the storm is probably putting paid to this week's session, and I want to get a playtest game of Kingdom in, but everyone is really happy to play again and most of the characters have exciting new status quos to consider.

    So this seems like a relevant question to ask: when reusing a character instead of starting from scratch, should they just keep all the Fates on their sheet? I actually don't really have a problem with that in general, but I feel like the Destinies at least should go away because they were assigned externally by the GM to tie them into a specific story, and that story is over.


  • So this seems like a relevant question to ask: when reusing a character instead of starting from scratch, should they just keep all the Fates on their sheet? I actually don't really have a problem with that in general, but I feel like the Destinies at least should go away because they were assigned externally by the GM to tie them into a specific story, and that story is over.
    Truly, the game is open because the author had a spirit of "whichever works for you". But in an official replay, the characters did actually keep their old fates. Most of the time, by Act Zero the player should get rid of ones that won't come up.

    And yeah, destinies should more often than not be sublimated after the last act ("epilogue") or before the next game begins, unless the story found a way for the player to keep it and remain interested in it.

    -Andy
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