[IndieGoGo] The Quiet Year: a map game about a post-collapse community

edited October 2012 in Directed Promotion
Friends,

October is my favourite month. I've decided to celebrate it with the launch of this IndieGoGo campaign: The Quiet Year.

image

(not sure why the image is blue here. It should be tan-brown.)

The Quiet Year is a map-drawing game. It's for 2-4 players, and takes 2-4 hours.

When you play The Quiet Year, you collectively create a post-civilization-collapse community and you guide it through a quiet year set amidst the chaos and violence of the apocalypse. It's a game about rebuilding, community, hope, despair, working together, falling out of love with one another, choices, time, and landscapes. It's not a roleplaying game (in that we never adopt characters, instead speaking as the abstracted voices of the community), but it's sort-of a story games (in that its play conjures up a story, in that it demands creative input, in that it involves imagination).

The IndieGoGo page includes lots of information, which I won't repeat verbatim here. Follow the link out!
The short summation is: IndieGoGo for a short, poetic map-game for $5 PDF / $25 Print / $40 Bagged Set.

I'd love to answer questions.
I'd love to hear people talk about good playtesting experiences.
I'd love to hear people talk about the specifics of their bad playtesting experiences (and in some cases, I can tell you that the game has changed and evolved based on your feedback or concerns).
I'd love to have this promoted in your circles.
I'd love your support.
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Comments

  • I had the pleasure of looking over Ross Cowan's shoulder while he ran a session of this at Pax Prime. I was jealous that I wasn't playing, and I'm glad to see it up on IndieGoGo. Backed!
  • Wow, this looks exactly like something my friend would be completely into. I hope he becomes a psychotically over-generous backer. (I may do the same.) E-mailing him right now.
  • It is a crime against my humanity that I haven't been able to play this game yet. Joe has done a lot of exciting things, but I suspect this is the most exciting yet. Backing this the moment I get paid this week.
  • I play tested The Quiet Year at GPNW this year w Joe, and found the game to be very moving and complex in it's emotional content.

    Playing a "group" rather than playing a "character" is a big change from how I typically role-play. And I like it!

    The cards inform the play without being overbearing. I like that there is always a choice.

    The timing mechanic is rather clever and allows the group to create cascading events.

    And the changing of the seasons just feels...right.

    The subject matter is not going to be for everyone. And honestly, the tokens and the "talking stick" concepts were difficult for me to get my head around. But they really seemed to inform the style of play that Joe is going for here.

    If you want to play something truly innovative in its storytelling, BACK THIS!
  • There are so many things I want to do with this game!
  • edited October 2012
    This is a lovely game, and it's amazing how quickly tensions emerge inside the community you're creating (tensions that are military, religious, ecological and generational in nature). I'm very keen to play again.
  • The subject matter is not going to be for everyone. And honestly, the tokens and the "talking stick" concepts were difficult for me to get my head around. But they really seemed to inform the style of play that Joe is going for here.
    I'm going to post additional information about the game (and some art teasers) as the campaign unfurls, but this information seems perhaps the most important to address first:

    Why You Might Not Like This Game
    (some people like to hard sell: I like to strategically unsell. wut up haters.)

    The game mechanics involve strained communication and limits on how much information we can share as players. I think constraint breeds creativity, and I also think that this is an essential part of The Quiet Year meant to evoke the difficulty in getting whole communities engaged in dialogue. But some people will be quite frustrated by it.

    The game involves drawing on a map. You don't have to draw well, and you don't have to make all of your drawings literal (ie. a circle with two sticks can be "a deer" that's metonymous for "a herd of deer grazing in the forest"), but you do need to draw as part of play. Some people might not be able to do this (for physical or phobic reasons). (Though everyone who I've played with so far has embraced the drawing, after an initial hurdle of fear and self-doubt.)

    The game asks you to play an amorphous role. You sort-of play a leader in the community, sort-of play a current of thought in the community, sort-of play devil's advocate... all at once. Some people like playing games that give them a tangible character & a specific perspective. This isn't that game.

    The game doesn't produce a single master narrative of your community struggles. By that I mean a number of things: the game doesn't follow a narrative arc of rising action & climax; the communication limits & contempt tokens work to produce play where everyone is operating on incomplete information and trying to suss out what their community members actually want; the game ends abruptly and what that ending means isn't always clear. I'm hesitant to call any of the mechanics "post-modern," but if someone else called them that, I'd smile and nod and agree. To contrast The Quiet Year with Microscope: The Quiet Year is grounded in time and place, but its story is an open-ended gestalt; Microscope is unshackled from time and place, but its story culminates in a single linear narrative.

    So, yeah. Those are some reasons why you might dislike the game: it involves strained communication, it involves drawing, your role is amorphous, the story that emerges is open-ended.
  • The very fact that you say "I'm hesitant to call any of the mechanics "post-modern," but if someone else called them that, I'd smile and nod and agree," makes me want to back this :)
  • Add me to the chorus of praise for The Quiet Year. It's unlike anything else I've ever played, in a good way. It's worthy of your time and support.
  • Could you talk a little more about gameplay -- i.e., how is it played, what kinds of events/decisions can come up, what are some of the more unique things the players can encounter, etc.
  • It's unlike anything else I've ever played, in a good way.
    I agree that it's pretty unique! But if I were trying to point to games that it was in the same genre as, I'd probably point to Microscope, How to Host a Dungeon, and Chronicles of Skin.

    On G+, Lukas Myhan summarized as "It's sort of like the collaborative tabletop equivalent of video games like Civilization or Sim City. You should check it out." Yeah. That's not a bad description. My allusion that I'd make to other media is: if the point of Carcassone were to make problematic poetry about the map, then it'd be like that.
  • edited October 2012
    I have played this game three (or four?) times at various stages of its development, and each iteration (and game) has been an improvement on the last.

    The most striking thing for me about this game, which may seem a little odd to say, is the intense feeling of replayability -- I always want to play another game of this, in a way that almost feels more like a particularly well-designed board game than like a roleplaying game. Given that it is a 2-4 hour game, this is obviously a crucial selling-point: I can't imagine any group of people getting tired of playing The Quiet Year.

    Part of this is the pacing -- the game doesn't wait for you to be 'ready' or 'done', it just ends. Often abruptly, though as you play it more you can sometimes see it coming, depending on how the cards fall. This is definitely a game I felt like I have gotten better at, the more I have played it.

    The game also feels extremely responsive to me as well, in terms of its interaction with the people playing it. It can be played in a lot of different directions, on a lot of different levels, depending on what the players put into it, and where they steer it. There is a thematic core, but the game does not demand emotional seriousness or require some particular effort on the part of the players in order to address its themes. A group that approaches the game with seriousness or intense deliberation will find that the game rises to the occasion; but the same will be true if the group focuses on wild sci-fi speculation or fantastical melodrama or whatever-else.

    Finally, while it's accurate to warn people that this is not a roleplaying game, in the sense that you get to take on an individual, consistent, role, I find that the game becomes immensely more rewarding the more players try to commit to the idea of playing the community, and of exploring and bringing-out specific impulses or groups or voices within the community. In my experience, the seasonal arc of the game tends to align very well with an arc among the players, who increasingly develop more and more specific ideas of what is and is not acceptable for their vision of the community -- and while this arc is unlikely to culminate in somehow 'playing a character', it is often the case that I will find myself speaking with more and more distinct voices as the game continues. Because the community itself has developed, with the help of the players, and those voices have emerged from the community's circumstances.

    And then the Frost Shepherds come, and those voices fall silent.
  • Could you talk a little more about gameplay -- i.e., how is it played, what kinds of events/decisions can come up, what are some of the more unique things the players can encounter, etc.
    Sure. I'll start with linking you to some actual play:

    Self-Critical Hits did an actual-play episode of The Quiet Year on their podcast. That was a much older version, and the game has gone through lots of changes: there are fewer actions per season, "Working Constantly" doesn't exist anymore, Hasty/Cautious don't exist anymore, and the cards are a lot more interesting and tight. The result of these changes is that the game is more grounded and focused, and that the cards prompt in interesting directions. Still, it's a pretty good representation of what the game can do (though they get much sillier and more "deep end" than the average game).

    So, I'll re-post here the weekly structure of the game, and then give a two-week example of play. Hopefully that'll give you a taste of what the game is like:

    image

    It's mid-Summer

    Joe begins by drawing a card from the top of the deck. It's the 8 of Summer/Hearts. There are two options on it, and he needs to pick one and read it aloud. The option he doesn't choose is "An old man confesses to past crimes and atrocities. What has he done?")

    Joe: So, "A young boy starts digging in the ground and discovers something unexpected. What is it?" Hm... I think that he's searching over here, in the bog, and he discovers some kind of weird skeleton. He pulls it out of the mud with the help of his friends. It's sort of like an alligator, except that its limbs are articulated in too many places. A mutant, maybe?

    Lisa: You should add it to the map!

    Joe spends about 25 seconds drawing a weird animal spine over by the bogs. His picture is less than half an inch wide. Just a little symbol, really.

    Joe: Okay, projects.

    There are two dice sitting on the map, set to 3 and 2. Each of those dice is keyed to a project that the community is working on, and the numbers represent weeks remaining before the project is successfully finished. Joe knocks then both down by 1.

    Joe: Okay, for my action... I'm going to hold a discussion. I'll start it off with a question: "When we've finished the bridge repair project, will we resume the scouting project? Or is that too dangerous now?"

    In a discussion, everyone gets to weigh in once, with a single response.

    Lisa: I think that recon is what keeps us safe in the long run, so it's worth a bit of short-term risk.

    Kate: No. If we incite the wrath of another Seeder Colony, it could spell ruin for our community.

    Joe: To conclude - I think we should set up sentries and slowly widen our surveillance.

    That concludes the week. It's Lisa's week next, and she draws the 10. She chooses one of the two options to read aloud. The one she doesn't choose is "Something goes afoul and supplies are ruined. Add a new Scarcity."

    Lisa: Uh oh, guys. "A project fails. Which one? Why?" That's a tough one. The bridge is more important in the long run, I think. So the 'sun shrine' project get nixed.

    Lisa removes one of the dice from the map.

    Nobody is allowed to talk about this decision or utter protest at this point, because it isn't their turn and this isn't a discussion. They do have the option of taking a Contempt, though, which Kate does. She doesn't seem very impressed with this choice.

    Lisa knocks the remaining die from 2 to 1. The bridge will finish next week.

    Lisa: Okay. I think for my weekly action I'm going to start a project. We've been afraid of these Seeders for a while now, and some defences would be good. So we're going to train some sentries and arm them with whatever we found in that army jeep. How long will that take?

    Joe and Kate and Lisa spend about 20 seconds confirming that this seems like it'd logically be a 2 week project. Joe and Kate aren't allowed to protest the project at this point, because once again, it's not a discussion.

    Lisa: Great. Two weeks it is. She places a die marked "2" next to the jeep icon, because that seems like a symbolically appropriate place to 'anchor' the project for the moment.

    ******

    That's it! That's two weeks of the quiet year. The importance of all those actions was contextual. The significance of that Contempt token that Kate took is unclear to us as momentary observers!: I wonder what Lisa & Kate's dynamic was throughout Spring. I wonder what it'll be like in Autumn. Is there a burgeoning mystical/areligious conflict in the community?

    The play example here probably took 3-7 minutes of actual play time. A game can last up to 52 weeks, and typically that means it runs 3-4 hours (though some games play through in a tight 2 hours, and there is a "A Fleeting Year" sub-rule for playing quick games).
  • I guess my burning question is: what makes this 'post-collapse'? What convinces me that this couldn't be set in 1979 Ohio or 1012 Vinland?
  • Nice summation. I've never done Indiegogo before, but I think this may be my first.
  • Nice summation. I've never done Indiegogo before, but I think this may be my first.
    Excited to hear it!

    One thing to note about IndieGoGo that's different between it and Kickstarter: you can't undo an IndieGoGo pledge. Or at least, you couldn't last time I checked. So a good approach is to take a day or two and think it over, if you're not 100% committed to the idea just yet. :)

    Roger: I'm going to answer your question soon.
  • I liked it. (Was in a playtest that Steve Hickey ran.) It was very easy to build up a host of different voices as the game progressed - so one turn, you might be speaking for the young militants of the town, or another turn it might feel right to be thinking about older farmers or whatever, it just built up organically for everyone. Also, I really liked the Contempt mechanic - every now and then someone would do something unpopular and there'd be this universal ring of coins on the table.
  • The most striking thing for me about this game, which may seem a little odd to say, is the intense feeling of replayability -- I always want to play another game of this, in a way that almost feels more like a particularly well-designed board game than like a roleplaying game.
    Yeah! The game is loaded with possibilities and it compels their exploration.
  • I guess my burning question is: what makes this 'post-collapse'? What convinces me that this couldn't be set in 1979 Ohio or 1012 Vinland?
    This is a great question, Roger.

    There are a couple things that situate a game of The Quiet Year firmly outside of the realm of interconnected civilization:

    An immediate and exclusive focus on the events taking place on a small-scale map. The threats on the map are the threats we are worried about. The people on the map are the people we care about. The resources on the map are the resources we care about. Anything outside of the map is either incidental or non-central. Play is very grounded in an immediate, physical community that has to solve its own problems.

    Scarcity is a tangible and real thing that informs play. If there is a shortage of drinkable water, the game shifts its focus toward that Scarcity. If there aren't any game animals left, and we flag that as a Scarcity, then the game shifts its focus toward that. Our Scarcities play a heavy role in the direction that our community takes.

    The hierarchies are absent. There is no one in charge of the community. The rules of the game are designed to show that there's not enough time to please everyone and fix every problem, but there's no structure in place for prioritizing those things. Something has been taken out of the social structure (compared to our civilized world), and you play to find out how that absence gets approached.

    Now, these three things are also true of, say, an egalitarian-utopian settler's community. So how is The Quiet Year specifically about post-collapse and not about settlers? There are two answers. The first is, "Oh - you could definitely play this as a game about a limited-resource settling community! The mechanics definitely play to that scenario as well."

    The other answer is: the cards in The Quiet Year deck involve lots of mention of uncovering old things - rumours, past atrocities, supply caches, strange artefacts, thing buried in the dirt. The structure of "Discover Something New" points out that you can spend the whole game re-discovering things, which I think weights the game away from "settlers of america" and more toward "scavengers amidst the ruins."

    But I've seen the game successfully do all of the following: post-nuclear survivors, woodland rewilding, first colony ship, end-of-days rapture, the ice age cometh and encroacheth, the few remaining inhabitants of an abandoned ghost city. I guess you could say this is it's "range."
  • I have indeed supported SG designers on IndieGoGo before, and this is no different! Yay, $40 pack! :D I<3 paraphernalia.
  • Can you post some end-of-game maps (or even in-progress maps)? Might be fun to get a look at what a session can produce...
  • Can you post some end-of-game maps (or even in-progress maps)? Might be fun to get a look at what a session can produce...
    That's a very good question. I had a number saved on my computer, which last week died and became an expensive paperweight. (Also lost: the "Stretch Goals" banner that I hadn't yet uploaded to the IGG page; etc).

    So... I may still have physical copies of some maps. If so, I'll post them when I find them. If not, I'll be playing it twice at Big Bad Con this weekend, and will be sure to get some photos taken of the maps throughout play and afterward.

    The maps tend to slowly move from "sparse and formless" to "dense with scrawled symbology." Looking at a map without have played the game, afterward, it isn't going to be obvious what everything is. "Why is there a tin can symbol next to a snake? Are these squiggles supposed to be... a thing?"
  • It would be neat to scan the map every ten minutes during play and then produce a time-lapse animation of it.
  • edited October 2012
    Christopher - I'm playing a PbF game of it now using using a slide show format (one slide per week) in googledocs. You can scroll through the slides for just that effect.

  • Why You Might Not Like This Game
    (some people like to hard sell: I like to strategically unsell. wut up haters.)
    Joe, I no-fooling think this is actually pretty great, and very useful! Between this and the APs and the other specific stuff you're posting here, this is exactly the way I like to be sold on a game.

  • Joe, I no-fooling think this is actually pretty great, and very useful! Between this and the APs and the other specific stuff you're posting here, this is exactly the way I like to be sold on a game.
    Thanks! The strategic-unsell is a thing that I stole from Ben Lehman. If you check out his Polaris page, you'll see him doing the same thing: telling you why you might not like the game.

    I've bought games only to realize that obviously they aren't right for me. I don't like that feeling as a consumer. So as a producer, it's my goal to make sure I don't do that to other people. :)
  • Will the custom cards be available at a later date, or is this my only chance to snag a deck?
  • Will the custom cards be available at a later date, or is this my only chance to snag a deck?
    The book & cards will always be sold as a pair, I reckon. It doesn't make sense to sell the book alone, as the cards are available either in oracle-list in the PDF or in actual-cards in the fancy deck. If sold the book alone, it'd require people to also print from the PDF. Not ideal.

    So, yeah, the custom cards will be available at a later date. I am not yet sure if the bag set will be available for just the IndieGoGo campaign or indefinitely afterward as well. It depends on a couple factors, including perceived interest and how much energy it actually takes to assemble them. So, yeah, at this point I'm not sure if this will be the only chance to get your hands on:
    image
  • Thanks for your thoughtful and helpful response, Mcdaldno. You're doing a nice job selling this.
  • Yeah !
    The game was already sold on me. Post-apo, maps, global point of view. I love Microscope, Chronicles of Skin, Apocalypse World and all your games, so this one was a mandatory purchase.
    Anyway, your honesty and transparency is very pleasant.
  • Hurray!
    The Quiet Year has hit its initial $4,000 goal. The game will definitely get published and funded.

    There are some stretch goals I'm really excited about. At $8,000, Tony Dowler is going to draw up a series of three Charted Areas. These are sort of "quick-start" maps that do the initial game setup for you (determining the rough area, listing abundances and scarcities). They're a cool twist on the game (which normally starts very "blank slate"). One of the reasons that this is exciting is that there are a few terrain types (tunnel systems, building interiors, etc) that don't get played in very often as a result of how the terrain emerges through play. Charted Areas will let me & Tony present those play settings to you in an easier-reached vessel. Fingers crossed.

    Ariel has been making cool art for this game. Since we hit our goal, now seems like a good time to share one of the near-finished pieces. Say hello to the ominously-titled "City of Wolves":
    image
  • Nice! Can't wait!
  • Pretty! The wolf in the center could use a bit more detail, but I love the simple skyline and the dark, shadowy wolf on the side! Anyway, it isn't finished, but I love it all the same.
  • "map-drawing game"
    I now understand perfectly why my husband (dylanix) went nuts over it. We've backed :)
    Looking forward to playing!
  • I finished re-writing the game text, and it's now in the hands of an editor friend. My next big step is to nail down the layout of the cards, a task that has involved a lot of second-guessing to date. When I've got something that I'm proud and sure of, in terms of card layout, I'll share it here and ask for some feedback.

    Art continues to roll in from Ariel, who's most recent piece is titled "The Old War" -
    image
  • I love the art so much.
  • Wow, colour me at least $50 interested (come payday). I love Joe's stuff.
  • Wow, love the new art!

    The Quiet Year mashed up with Twilight:2000 :)
  • Thanks, Wyrmwood and Caesar.

    I'm excited about the art, too. It's the work of Ariel, who's DeviantArt account is Tunnelinu. When I first contacted her, she had only a couple illustrations in this minimal-line-art style. I was kind of going out on a limb, but I am ecstatic with how that choice has paid off.

    She works in a couple different styles. Her fan-created pokemon are incredibly cool, to the point where I wish I had a game about fighty animals.
  • edited October 2012
    Backing because I love maps, the art is awesome, and Joe is making it. :D

    eta: The video you made was rad!
  • Just backed it and it feels so good. I really like this game and I am so psyched to have a super legit looking version to play.
    Let me set the scene for you:

    Numnutses are walking around the convention. They approach the table and see our sweet map, counters, and cards. I'm still talking as I hand them the book. My actions make it obvious, "I know you think what we are doing is cool. We are really into it, so we won't stop, but here's a hint about the NEW HOTNESS. YOU'RE WELCOME."
  • edited October 2012
    I've finally managed to convince my browser to let me fund this. I'm really looking forward to seeing the rewrite: as I mentioned upthread, I enjoyed playtesting The Quiet Year.

    Joe, in your original post you said this:
    I'd love to hear people talk about the specifics of their bad playtesting experiences (and in some cases, I can tell you that the game has changed and evolved based on your feedback or concerns).
    The events that happen in the game are divided into seasons. Due to wickedly improbable card draws, our group had an Autumn that only lasted two weeks and our Winter ended on the very first week, with the Frost Giants coming. We found that profoundly dis-satisfying but I really enjoyed the email conversations you and I had about it afterwards: I felt you very carefully and definitely acknowledged our issue.

    I'd be interested to know what your final thoughts were on the possibility of an 'Early Autumn and Winter' card draw.

  • I also experienced a very quick Autumn-Winter combo in one of my first games -- which I found both interesting and also kind of frustrating. Joe will probably give a more in-depth answer, but I seem to remember that in the latest version of the game that I have played, there is no longer a card in Autumn that causes you to immediately skip to Winter. There is one card in all the seasons that makes you discard the next two cards, with the primary effect of introducing variety -- I don't remember if this card varies from season to season or not.

    So you can still have a very short winter, but it can no longer come on the heels of a near-instantaneous fall.
  • You could always card-engineer if you wanted to. You could split each of the Autumn and Winter suits into 2 halves and make sure the king card in each was in the second half before shuffling. That way you know you'll have a minimum of 7 of the 13 weeks in each of those seasons.

    That's a little more complicated of a setup, which would sound harder to justify to someone reading through the rules for the first time.

    But I think it would be worth it, not just to keep the game from feeling short, but to guarantee that you get some time to experience the difference between the spring and summer week events, which are mostly gentle, and the autumn and winter week events, which are far more harsh. Getting to experience the frustration of how often projects fail or require sacrifices to succeed in those seasons seems like an important part of the game to not skip.

    (This suggestion being based on a close read through the rules, but not having played yet. Take it with salt as due.)
  • Due to wickedly improbable card draws, our group had an Autumn that only lasted two weeks and our Winter ended on the very first week, with the Frost Giants coming. We found that profoundly dis-satisfying but I really enjoyed the email conversations you and I had about it afterwards: I felt you very carefully and definitely acknowledged our issue.

    I also experienced a very quick Autumn-Winter combo in one of my first games -- which I found both interesting and also kind of frustrating. Joe will probably give a more in-depth answer, but I seem to remember that in the latest version of the game that I have played, there is no longer a card in Autumn that causes you to immediately skip to Winter.
    The card you're both talking about, the one that skipped the remainder of Autumn, was the King of Clubs. It was a darling of mine. It was very hard to kill it off and replace it with something different. But I did. Breaking the "all four kings accelerate the year towards its ending" structure was the last major change that the game received.

    The King of Diamonds (Summer) retains the "discard two from the top of the deck" text and the King of Spades (Winter) retains the Frost Shepherds arriving and ending the game (obviously). The other two Kings now follow a different course. As a result, the game has a much more predictable run-time.

    I've also introduced rules for playing A Fleeting Year - a year that runs shorter than the full 52-card deck. To play A Fleeting Year you discard 4 cards out of each season before playing (making sure to lose the King of Diamonds and retain the King of Spades).
  • "map-drawing game"
    I now understand perfectly why my husband (dylanix) went nuts over it. We've backed :)
    Looking forward to playing!
    She doesn't lie; I love maps.

    I had the chance to play this at Big Bad Con. At several points during the game I couldn't help but break out in a huge grin while looking at the map. Watching our community grow, struggle, cave in, rebuild - we weren't just talking about these things, we illustrated these things and had them ever present, sitting in front of us. It kept the conversation at the table tightly focused on the needs of the people.

    There's such a rhythm to the proceedings. The incessant flow of time punctuates the planned activities and creates a beat by which the community moves. Long-term plans arc behind bursts of short-term gain and loss. Sometimes it all comes crashing to a halt, sometimes the sacrifices pay off and bring bounty to the people.

    There are always meaningful choices to be made, facilitated by the turn structure. Even when it isn't your turn, the ability to show contempt for the actions of others in the community is a powerful indicator for and influence on future actions.

    It's a gem of a game, and I heartily endorse supporting it through this fundraising campaign.

    Here's the map from our session:
    image
  • edited October 2012
    Thanks, Dylan!

    To give that map a bit more context for readers at home, here's a couple stories about some of those pictures:
    image

    Also worth noting: those are just a couple of the stories and details tied to each of those pictures. For example, the wolves in the observatory continued to spiral outward as the year progressed: when the healer-training program failed, some of the more vindictive members of the community formed a sin-hunting Court of the Stars, which took residence in the observatory. The wolves were killed. The Court professed to be killing the impure of our community, but was secretly stowing them in the observatory. (they were as scared and bewildered as everyone else.) When the rest of the community eventually moved into the caves for the winter, the council stayed in their observatory. Speculation was passed about the possibility that maybe, come spring, they would emerge as wolves themselves. (no conclusion was ever drawn in-game about whether our supernatural beliefs were grounded.)
  • I'm finally a backer of this. I can't wait to play it.
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