[World of Dungeons] Who's played the most?

RyRy
edited July 2013 in Story Games
Who has played World of Dungeons the most?

What happens when you play it for a longer term game? Rough edges? Problems?

Comments

  • Dungeon girls probably. Check our the ap.
  • We've played a shit ton of it hacked for Stalker, if that counts, without any problems.
  • edited July 2013
    In my XP, there's a big jump between level 1 and level 2, especially in terms of hit points and survivability, but the later jumps don't make as huge of a difference in changing how things work. I haven't had any problems so far, though if you want things to stay gritty and deadly, you're mostly talking about staying at the lower levels and only gradually moving up as characters managed to somehow survive, which means the GM really has to bring the meat ginder and make hard moves. If you play with a lighter hand, it's easier to survive the lower levels and then things get increasingly less deadly as you go up. That would be my only concern about long-term play: get everybody on the same page about playing a super-deadly grind (Jason's Stalker adaption is great for this) and then ACTUALLY DO THAT, or be okay with it being more explorative and drama-focused rather than super-deadly all the time.
  • P.S. This is why it works for both Stalker and Dungeon Girls: there aren't too many GM guidelines baked into it, so it really depends on how you want to bring the peril.
  • Yeah, the one time I ran it I noticed a lot of my old bad habits reared their heads. For misses I delivered rather a lot of hit point damage because it seemed easy.
  • In another thread, John layed it out pretty hard, like:

    10+, they do it.
    7-9, they do it, but probably take some damage.
    6-, nope, and they probably take some damage.

    So, if you want to run it pretty old school, consider dealing damage whenever they don't roll a 10+, as part of whatever other move you're making. And sometimes they take damage from fictional decisions ("You grab the red-hot thing? Okay...") without getting a chance to roll. If your 7-9 choices and failures are weak, it's easy to just wave hands at the danger instead of really engaging with it.
  • We have a multi-year West Marches WoD thing going on. Like other's have said, works fine. I keep the silver brutally low. Our characters are fairly low level but they have a lot of fictional things to play with.
  • Ara, have your players asked for more rules or options to sink their teeth into? Have you expanded the list of equipment and cost?
  • Ry,

    We have an every expanding and contracting set of moves. Basically sticky notes get added on and removed as the tactical landscape changes. No one really explicitly asks, hmmm I think I might ask once in awhile. If someone is hammering away at one thing in the fiction then it gets a sticky note. It is usually a move but sometimes just a thing they do in the fiction.

    Yeah, there are costs for everything particular if you are hanging out in town. I gutted the eq list to better reflect the setting we are running with and it changes with the seasons.
  • edited July 2013
    The game is designed to hack it as you go. It starts out super simple, then you'll add moves, tweak abilities, tune the deadliness, etc. to suit the goals of your table. It's a game design starter kit.

    Also, that thing Jonathan quotes, above, was specifically about straight-up toe-to-toe fighting. (link) I don't deal damage on all 7-9 rolls. Please let's not turn that into some kind of Internet-game-of-telephone "John said" pseudo rule. :)
  • Has anyone tried combining World of Dungeons with the kind of chargen and village setup of Beyond the Wall? Might be a fun way to start a no-prep game...
  • RyRy
    edited July 2013
    Player: "I try to chat up the barmaid."

    GM: "Well, there's a risk she'll really get creeped out by you... and some other stuff."

    Player: I got a 7.

    GM: "1d6 Alligator damage. Harper's rule, not mine."
  • If I play a cleric of John Harper, am I immune to the damage he causes on a 7-9?
  • Has anyone experimented with structured prep (i.e. Dogs towns)?
  • Has anyone tried combining World of Dungeons with the kind of chargen and village setup of Beyond the Wall? Might be a fun way to start a no-prep game...
    I keep thinking about it. It would make for a hell of a game.

  • Player: "I try to chat up the barmaid."

    GM: "Well, there's a risk she'll really get creeped out by you... and some other stuff."

    Player: I got a 7.

    GM: "1d6 Alligator damage. Harper's rule, not mine."
    Every quality establishment keeps an alligator in the back for these reasons.
  • All I meant to say was "consider" doing some damage on a 7-9 ("probably" is too strong, my bad). If it's not fictionally appropriate, obviously don't do it!
  • Not all damage is hit point damage.
  • On a 7-9, I usually deal brain damage, myself.
  • On a 7-9 the character takes damage. On a 6 or less the player takes damage.
  • We've played a shit ton of it hacked for Stalker, if that counts, without any problems.
    Has this hack ever been written up/discussed/published, anywhere?
  • Not all damage is hit point damage.
    And when Orlando ran Reverend Patriarch Walton's The Planarch's Codex, he was enlightened about the true nature of countdown-clocks:

    That they might be advanced whenever the fiction deems it to be true.

    That they might not only represent the Characters health, but any and all possible futures.
  • @Ry

    I prep the dungeons and the landscape to some extent but one of my principles is rolling on random tables for stuff.
  • In Dungeon Girls, the characters are hitting Levels 5 and 6 after about ten months of play. I haven't encountered any problems. The game is indeed very hackable. At 5th level, the characters' damage-dealing capability goes up quite a bit, maybe a bit faster than their ability to soak damage, but I've baked in some house rules in Dungeon Girls that make things less deadly.

    Magic users who make creative use of their spirits have a huge impact, especially when accumulation of new spirits comes into play. That said, the fact that you have to bargain with your magic or take an addicting drug each time you use it does balance it out. There are times at the table when everyone sits back and sighs because magic use is just so cool.
  • I ran it a few times, I really like it. I've been planning to write some stuff for it.

    I remember that on a 7-9 in melee, the PC's dagger got stuck in the enemy's ribcage once. Another time they overreached and got vaulted over some stairs. I guess the same goes as for most *W play. Ask (yourself and the players) questions about the fictional situation until you get something juicy.

    One problem I seem to remember was that one of the Fighter's abilities doesn't work as intended. And I was mostly confounded about what to do on 12+ results. The Dungeon Girls method of awarding luck points is good but it didn't jive with me.
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