[looking for feedback] #WritingWithDice

edited September 2015 in Game Design Help
Hi!

#WritingWithDice is a minimal implementation of a process I've been musing and working on for a long while. It's a process I've found satisfying and thought it might be useful to share.

The system is meant to provide a structured approach to writing fiction during those parts of a game when you are not engaging with creative aids (what are known as gm emulators/oracles, idea generators, etc, in the solo rpg niche).

The kind of feedback I'm looking for is stuff like how clear are the ideas coming through, do the current examples help, any holes you see (which means I left something implied and haven't realized it yet), etc or any other constructive feedback you can think of. Of course, if you do give it a test drive, let me know how you liked the experience.

The draft is at google docs: #WritingWithDice draft. If you have any questions also let me know.

Thanks!

p.s. I've enabled comments for people with this link, if you prefer to write feedback there. Thanks!

Comments

  • edited September 2015
    Write with dice made me think that it was for a random story generated with dice, which this doesn't do. Minor nitpik. I like the idea of the system but question the amount of material needed at beginning.

    As for the system it seems like a lot to work out before hand when it could be done along side the adventure. Statements and principles could be done in an improv manner. Once a statement is used it becomes a principle. Statements should build upon previous statements and principles. That way you can begin the story faster and give the writer more freedom. By the end of an adventure you'll have a large number of principles and statements but it doesn't become a hurdle to climb over at the beginning.

    15-20 principles seem like a lot to start off with.

    Is this for use with a pre-published module or is this for more freeform writing/solo play?





  • Thanks chaiboy. :)

    Write with dice made me think that it was for a random story generated with dice, which this doesn't do. Minor nitpik.
    It's sort of an reclamation of a phrase used as a a criticism of solo roleplaying, in the way that 'punk' was reclaimed, I guess. It applies more to people who write down their thoughts as prose when they solo rpg (others keep the story in their heads with perhaps a few notes).

    I also feel like playing solo is closer to GM preparation, blue booking and pbp than it is to a live face to face session. I consider those to be cousins of creative writing.


    As for the system it seems like a lot to work out before hand when it could be done along side the adventure. Statements and principles could be done in an improv manner. Once a statement is used it becomes a principle. Statements should build upon previous statements and principles. That way you can begin the story faster and give the writer more freedom. By the end of an adventure you'll have a large number of principles and statements but it doesn't become a hurdle to climb over at the beginning.
    The main concern I have is not losing the 'pushback' that the requirement around Principles puts into the system. If you start without them, and considering statements in the scene to be Principles, Step 4 is undermined, IMO.

    On the other hand, one of the variations I sometimes play with is to have a "free" introduction scene that's works as an introduction to the character and his world. Then I extract Principles from there. Would this alternative make it feel less of a hurdle?

    Is this for use with a pre-published module or is this for more freeform writing/solo play?
    I don't use it for pre-published modules, unless I'm cannibalizing those for setting information and ideas to use as Principles (and to generate assumptions of the setting in my head).

    Thanks for the feedback!
  • I see your point. Makes sense. So it sounds like this is for using a rpg to write with? Going by that idea your rules work great.
  • Yes, it's supposed to push you to write within the constraints of setting/genre, as well as the additional constraints of Principles (what you focus on in the setting). The constraints themselves are supposed to push you to make contact with the RPG rules system you are using when you want to include something outside of the focus of Principles.

    Thank you for your comments. I'm glad it comes across clearly.

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