Hard moves, soft moves: How gear breaks or fails?

RyRy
edited April 2017 in Make Stuff!
Like this:
  • That bottle of booze in your pack? It's been cracked for hours, must have happened in the fight.
  • Your ammo feels ... wet? Humid, at least.
  • This knife isn't just dull, it has a chip in it. Not useful for much longer.
  • Rust on the transmission… not a good sign. Next hard turn will be it.
More? More!

Comments

    • this makeshift armour is seriously starting to chafe
  • Small weevils got to the straps in your armor overnight. It won't stay on securely for long.
  • Boots need to be resoled because you've been walking for so long

    Your belt pouch must have caught in something and a hole is forming
  • Wetness, getting into your boots
  • I like it better when it's directly led from the fiction. Bam! Your shield is splintered. Snap! Now you have two ropes, half the length.

    Right when they're using it. They're letting the gear take the hit.
  • Your handcart just REEKS; somebody used it for moving a body, for sure.
  • Your gun goes Blam! But it didn't fire, and parts are missing, and your hand feels like it's ON FIRE
  • Your toes push down, in mud, your shoes have given up the ghost
  • RyRy
    edited April 2017
    I like it better when it's directly led from the fiction. Bam! Your shield is splintered. Snap! Now you have two ropes, half the length.

    Right when they're using it. They're letting the gear take the hit.
    I'm looking for the whole spectrum, from the softest foreshadowing "this gear looks sketchy" through to "I guess they don't make mountain climbing pitons like they used to, goodbye."

  • Jonathan Nicols nailed it in the other thread; how AW and DW makes us invested in fictional consequences. Having gear break as a consequence amplifies that, having it 'arbitrarily' break in storage undermines that. Obv it's a spectrum as you say. Perhaps storing it improperly is is established in the SIS. They just drop their knapsacks in a puddle in a hurry and the pitons rust, for example.
  • Yes - all of these are to give something for the GM to say at appropriate moments, not arbitrary ones.

    Say you, as MC, know this is a good moment, a good time for something to break or fail. What should you say?
  • @2097 I believe it actually lends texture to the fictional world when, on having a chance of making a move, I reflect on small details of the fiction that hadn't been of any consequence at the time of their introducing and reincorporate them, making them consequential now.
    You were running from a monster under heavy rain two hours ago? The rain was just a colorful detail in the moment, but now - in hindsight - it makes sense that your ammo got wet. Sure, I'm making it up now, the very moment you get to realize it - but it doesn't feel like a cheap quantum trick to me, it feels like I'm actually working with the established fiction and making it richer.
  • edited May 2017
    The rain was just a colorful detail in the moment, but now - in hindsight - it makes sense that your ammo got wet.
    I'm curious -- for you, would the process of coming up with this be more like A, B or C?
    A) Time for some bad news! Oh, hey, wouldn't that suck if their ammo weren't usable? Can I come up with a reason for that? Poor storage... vermin... oh, wait, we had rain recently! I'll go with that.

    B ) Time for some bad news! What inspires me from the recent fiction? That rain storm stuck in my brain for some reason. So, okay, cool, stuff got wet. Clothing, hats, shoes, rations, ammo... Wet ammo could be a big deal!

    C) Everyone's probably pretty soggy right now, I'll note that. Oh, hey, some of their gear might be impacted -- maybe even ammo. Next time I need to give them some bad news, I'll use that.
    I ask because I've tried various "reincorporate!" mechanics with minimal success, but have gotten great mileage out of doing it intuitively. I'm wondering if such a thing can be significantly supported by formal procedures or other system.
  • edited May 2017
    Back to Ry's request:

    Your bandages are a technicolor panoply of mold.

    Your brakes don't brake.

    Your food is infested with unfamiliar, tiny, wriggling insects.

    Your radio receives only a horrible static that sounds like screaming.

    All the valuables you used for barter are gone.

    Your med kit is warm to the touch. When you open it, a hideous, pulsating, spherical thing falls out.
  • edited May 2017
    The rain was just a colorful detail in the moment, but now - in hindsight - it makes sense that your ammo got wet.
    I'm curious -- for you, would the process of coming up with this be more like A, B or C?

    A) Time for some bad news! Oh, hey, wouldn't that suck if their ammo weren't usable? Can I come up with a reason for that? Poor storage... vermin... oh, wait, we had rain recently! I'll go with that.

    B ) Time for some bad news! What inspires me from the recent fiction? That rain storm stuck in my brain for some reason. So, okay, cool, stuff got wet. Clothing, hats, shoes, rations, ammo... Wet ammo could be a big deal!

    C) Everyone's probably pretty soggy right now, I'll note that. Oh, hey, some of their gear might be impacted -- maybe even ammo. Next time I need to give them some bad news, I'll use that.

    I ask because I've tried various "reincorporate!" mechanics with minimal success, but have gotten great mileage out of doing it intuitively. I'm wondering if such a thing can be significantly supported by formal procedures or other system.
    "A" I don't like, and isn't a thought process I'm generally capable of making... as a GM/MC. It's something I would definitely do as my move in a Polaris conflict, though.

    "C" is what I wish I was able to do, as a GM/MC, but generally fail at. There are way too many variables to keep track of.

    "B" is what I tend to do as an AW MC, and totally works for me. It's also what I was thinking of in my previous post, pretty much exactly.
  • "You know those ringed enamel shells you've been carrying for trade? Well, you're approaching the city, and suddenly, all around you on the ground... there are hundreds, thousands of them, as though someone threw down from the sky."

    * This could be an opportunity (to collect some to take back to where they came from).

    * But, more likely, it is bad news: you realize now there's no way the local people are going to think your little collection is worth trading for anything. [Your money/barter/jingle is worthless here.]

    I like when a new piece of information can serve as both.

    (Ry, it's been too long since we've played together! You even inspired me to start a new "do it yourself" thread of my own. We don't have so many now that you're not around as much! These are fun. Here's mine.)
  • Rafu, David: for DW, all three of a, b and c have a strong connection to things that has been established as having happened.
    Whereas "weevils ate your armor" or "belt pouch must've caught in something" are, while realistic, something that feels more jarring.
  • - This book seems to be losing pages from overuse. Not surprising, considering how old it is, and the spine's never been in great shape since you found it. I wonder whether all pages are still there?

    @2097 it looks like everyone's agreeing, then, doesn't it? I mean, what feels jarring in context is probably a move one shouldn't have tried.
  • @2097 it looks like everyone's agreeing, then, doesn't it? I mean, what feels jarring in context is probably a move one shouldn't have tried.
    Yeah, but when I joined the thread on April 30 there were nine suggestions and to me all of them gave me that feeling.

    As did the book/overuse one now. But context is everything.
  • Principle: - Gear + Recent fiction + Legit window to make hard move = "Use up their resources"

    Example:

    • Book + Rain + Players gave golden opportunity = Soggy book
    • Shoes + Lava + Player rolled 6- = Burned shoes
    • Spear + Birds + Player rolled 6- = Birds stole spear
  • I tend to forget gear and weather and mundane details in my games, particularly in moves. But I like those details because they give the world texture.
  • Yeah, they're nice in that way
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