[Witch Quest] scenarios?

Ewen Cluney, @Wilhelm Person and anybody who's played Witch Quest...

Are there any scenarios lying around, apart from the one in the book? Do you have any of your own devising?
Alternatively, do you have a scenario design method of your own? What works and what doesn't?

Comments

  • Sorry. Nothing on paper.

    Did you find my article on how to play WQ? I think I have posted it here once.
  • Ah, yes! I have more thoughts on WQ. I'll structure them a bit and get back to you.
  • That's very much appreciated. Thank you!
  • edited May 2017
    Right. We have played WQ in three different styles.

    1) The harem-style story was first, it is the one in the article from May 2010. It was a large group. The story centered around a boy who was supposed to learn farming so that he could ... get into farmer college? So it was the boy, a bunch of witches and their cats. The "background" was that it was a witch-test "teach the boy enough about farming that he can get into farming college." None of the witches knew anything about farming, hilarity ensued. Every session was centered around some issue or event at the small farm they had at their disposal. Stuff like planting a carrot field, or fixing a leaky roof.

    2) Short episode style. GM plus one or two witch/cat pairs. Really short 40-60 minute adventures. A short bit setting the scene, the introduction of an issue, resolving the issue, and finally friendship and cake for everyone. There doesn't really need to be a lot of "plot" or any character development. Just a merry romp of cats and witches. And everyone knows that it will end with friendship and cake.

    3) Traditional convention style gaming. I have written a 4-hour adventure, which I have run a couple of times at conventions. Two pairs of cats and witches. A mysterious event. Traditional problem solving and adventure.

    I find all styles enjoyable.

    For all three styles witch-players wear mandatory witch scarves, of which I have a bag full. So that they can pick one that matches their style. Cat players wear mandatory cat ear props. There is tea at the table, flower pattern cups is nice. Cake is optional. Chips and sausages are right out.
  • Right. We have played WQ in three different styles.

    1) The harem-style story was first, it is the one in the article from May 2010. It was a large group. The story centered around a boy who was supposed to learn farming so that he could ... get into farmer college? So it was the boy, a bunch of witches and their cats. The "background" was that it was a witch-test "teach the boy enough about farming that he can get into farming college." None of the witches knew anything about farming, hilarity ensued. Every session was centered around some issue or event at the small farm they had at their disposal. Stuff like planting a carrot field, or fixing a leaky roof.
    Thanks for the detailed explanation! "Harem" is probably my weakest suit when it comes to manga/anime, so I wasn't sure I got it from the original article.
    2) Short episode style. GM plus one or two witch/cat pairs. Really short 40-60 minute adventures. A short bit setting the scene, the introduction of an issue, resolving the issue, and finally friendship and cake for everyone. There doesn't really need to be a lot of "plot" or any character development. Just a merry romp of cats and witches. And everyone knows that it will end with friendship and cake.
    I'm definitely interested in this style! Can you provide any examples of issues/starting situations that worked well for you?

    Also, how many Cat Points do you usually give out for a short episode?
    3) Traditional convention style gaming. I have written a 4-hour adventure, which I have run a couple of times at conventions. Two pairs of cats and witches. A mysterious event. Traditional problem solving and adventure.
    Would you say the example scenario in the book fits here, in terms of length as well as style?
    For all three styles witch-players wear mandatory witch scarves, of which I have a bag full. So that they can pick one that matches their style. Cat players wear mandatory cat ear props. There is tea at the table, flower pattern cups is nice. Cake is optional. Chips and sausages are right out.
    That's adorable! I love it!
  • edited July 2017
    2) Short episode style. GM plus one or two witch/cat pairs. Really short 40-60 minute adventures. A short bit setting the scene, the introduction of an issue, resolving the issue, and finally friendship and cake for everyone. There doesn't really need to be a lot of "plot" or any character development. Just a merry romp of cats and witches. And everyone knows that it will end with friendship and cake.
    I'm definitely interested in this style! Can you provide any examples of issues/starting situations that worked well for you?

    Also, how many Cat Points do you usually give out for a short episode?
    3) Traditional convention style gaming. I have written a 4-hour adventure, which I have run a couple of times at conventions. Two pairs of cats and witches. A mysterious event. Traditional problem solving and adventure.
    Would you say the example scenario in the book fits here, in terms of length as well as style?


    Short adventure seeds:
    - Witch moves into town, find a place to stay.
    - Witch wants pancakes for breakfast, there are no eggs.
    - A child has lost his teddy bear.

    We've just played it straight when it comes to the cat points, I don't have the book in front of me, 50?

    Well, the scenario in the book is a bit more social realism than I like, mine was more of an adventure. But yes, in scope it looks about right.
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