Fast Food Game Aids

edited February 2007 in Story Games
I went to Wendy's for lunch today and when I unwrapped my sandwich I noticed the inside of the wrapper was a hexmap. The hexes were too small for standard minis, but I could totally see a bunch of gamers stroll into a Wendys, order a couple chicken sandwiches or burgers for game night, and walk out with not only food but a handful of free game resources to boot.

So my question is this: have you found any hidden troves of gaming resources out in the 'real world'? Has anyone ever used their tile floor as a grid-map, or used a board game as a territory map? What mundane objects have you turned into gaming aids?

Comments

  • Old age fails me for the details but I recall a college campus I drolled over because the cafeteria floor were hexes! I wanted to go home and get my giant resin Silent Death minis :)
  • For a chess variant I was playtesting, I went to the local diner with a friend and ripped open packets of sugar & Sweet n Low, dumped the contents out, and put then on some of the pieces as armor. My friend was highly amused by this bit of ingenuity.
  • Like eruditus, I have used a tile floor as a hex map. From working in a kitchen, baking parchment is great for making handouts and maps, though it's a challenge to pick it up as a customer.
    Happy meal toys often have utility for games, usually in conjunction with minis. I've made many a statue from them.
  • I haven't done it yet (though I'm working on a game that lends itself to the idea), but I have a ton of various kinds of anime merchandise around, and I want to see about using it as some kind of visual aid, especially for one-shots where the players never really get to know each others' characters' names. So for example:

    In the internet fandom Azumanga Daioh has been crossed over with just about anything and everything (for example, Michael Hopcroft posted on RPG.net not too long ago about how he was going to use BESM for basically a mashup of Azumanga and Doctor Who, with Osaka as the title character, naturally). Since I have mini-plushies of all the main characters, it makes for a handy way to decide and keep track of who's who, and sort of assign an archetype to each character in the process.

    I also have more Pink Street figures than I care to admit to, and as they're basically little plastic dolls with interchangeable parts, I could have the players each assemble one to their liking as the start of character creation for something.

    Thanks to Anime Palace's main store being so close by (in one case it was less than 5 minutes from a friend's workplace for a while), a couple of my friends also have more plastic figures than they know what to do with. Some of them (like the Phantasy Star Online capsule toys) are actually scaled right to be used on a typical hex grid as miniatures.


    Also, when I decided I wanted those flat glass beads to use as counters, I went to Cost Plus and got jars of the kind that are being sold as things to put decorative plants and whatnot in, since they cost far less than the ones being sold as game aids, despite being exactly the same thing.
  • Posted By: Neko EwenAlso, when I decided I wanted those flat glass beads to use as counters, I went to Cost Plus and got jars of the kind that are being sold as things to put decorative plants and whatnot in, since they cost far less than the ones being sold as game aids, despite being exactly the same thing.
    Pet stores carry them in a wide variety of colors and translucencies as fish-bowl liner. You can get roughly a thousand beautiful glass counters (in a single color) for a dollar or two. Go crazy! Spend ten bucks! Get so many counters that you'll need a pirate's treasure chest to carry your trove of lovely gems. I did!

    Or, y'know ... distribute the vast number of extras to your gaming friends.

    God, glass counters sold in small packs as gaming equipment ... what a scam.
  • Too right, Tony.

    I have a couple of tiny marble bowls I picked up from Ikea for a few quid. One's black, one's white, and so I use them for DRYH. Clear beads look especially nifty in them. And of course, I have hundreds of glass beads in different colors, aswell as gold and silver nuggets.

    I've wanted to run a TransFormers game for the longest time, using actual toys. But I also have a bunch of magnetic strips and some steel bookends, so I could make _actual metal character sheets_.

    Joe.
  • Homies figurines cost a quarter apiece.

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  • Plastic toy soldiers make great inexpensive war pieces. I wrote a game that uses them once. It was a pretty fun game.

    Every time I get change, I get a random result generator in the form of coins.
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