MMORPGize your favorite story games

edited October 2007 in Story Games
OK, so here's the ludicrous stuff I think about when I'm driving my kid to her theater class...

World of Dogs in the Vinyard

You play God's Watchdogs in a persistent world, judging sinners and banishing demons. You hang out in Bridal Falls Temple until you gather enough Dogs for a raid, then you head out to a nearby town and start judging. Any time you win a conflict, your opponent drops phat loot, by way of new traits like "A penchant for marshmallows 2d6" or "Allergic to strawberries 3d8." Every town ends with a boss fight against a demon who's guarding a chest full of belongings where you can roll in your ceremonies, provided you have enough manna points.

Anyone else want to give it a try? Go ahead, its fun.

Comments

  • edited October 2007
    I don't know if this is really in line with your original post but I think a lot about how to make a video game equivalent of Dogs in the Vineyard. But I honestly mean equivalent. In that you would create a character and actually be able to pass judgment, take action and have the NPCs of the town dynamically respond.

    I once sketched some ideas for how to create a Story Now MMO. I thought about eliminating levels and gear and instead you gain levels of influence over the world similar to Trollbabe. So at first, you could only flirt with bar maids, and bribe guards. But eventually you could rally the patrons of a tavern to a cause and eventually you would command armies and so forth.

    The problem is that all of my ideas require people "playing honestly" and not just being dicks. You know, that guy who had become a king of a nation over there coming in and killing your favorite barmaid, just cause he can and not for any particularly compelling reason. And sadly in the public arena there's no perfect way to control griefers short of reporting and banning. Which then turns the whole thing into an admin tyranny.... and then everything I would be interested in such an undertaking would be lost anyway.

    Jesse
  • edited October 2007
    Interesting, lemme also throw a lateral pass in this thread:

    Together by Jack Aidley

    http://www.game-chef.com/workshop/?PostBackAction=Download&AttachmentID=225

    A true story games(ish) tabletop MMO. Or better yet, like RPGA but all storylike.

    -Andy
  • By the power vested in me as the OP, I declare you both on topic for this thread.

    Jesse: I was being frivolous, and really didn't deserve such a serious response. However, I like the idea for your Story now MMO. I wouldn't let the fact that it relies on players not being dickish. There are workarounds for examples like your barmaid killer (not making NPCs killable for example - its not very realistic but it is story now, not simulation now, after all). They're not perfect, admittedly, but work well enough. My OP was prompted by the times I've heard about mixing storygames and online MMOs. It just struck me how hard it would be to implement DitV's raise and see escalation mechanic in that environment, and what a different kind of play experience that would be like. Same with SOTC's compells. Or With Great Power's suffering. And it is hard to imagine a full on Burning Wheel battle of wits on WoW. Not very visual.

    Andy: Together looks like an interesting game idea, but what makes it RPGAlike or a Tabletop MMO? It looks like your typical Story game structure. A broadly defined setting, with some stats and traits.
  • Posted By: noclueAndy:Togetherlooks like an interesting game idea, but what makes it RPGAlike or a Tabletop MMO? It looks like your typical Story game structure. A broadly defined setting, with some stats and traits.
    You basically stat out characters, play them, etc. Then, if you move to another (fictional) gaming group playing the same game, your character literally blends right in at the same power level. Each tabletop is a "server" or "instance". I'm actually almost hot to play it in the area between a few gaming groups, and then swap-members (like, say, three sessions) to see what the end product is like: Say 3 sessions, 3 GMs, but after that it's all up to the players..

    -Andy
  • Sounds cool.
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