How would you do ghost busters

edited May 2009 in Story Games
Inspired by an RPG.Net thread of roughly the same content, I thought I would ask, as the video game and the 25? year aniversary is coming up?

Give me some suggestions

Bonus Points if its dogs in the vineyard (worst matchup ever)

Logos

Comments

  • Have you heard of InSpectres?
  • edited May 2009
    inSpectres!

    [edit: crossposted with Hansel, I was replying to the first post]
  • Seriously, this is exactly InSpectres job. It does it perfectly.
  • edited May 2009
    Burning Wheel. Orcs love ghosts. Tasty tasty.

    But yes, InSpectres. Also, isn't there a d6 GhostBusters game already?
  • Of course InSpectres. Duh.

    I'm gonna be a dissenting voice, and suggest...

    ...no, actually. InSpectres pretty much has it handled.

    You could play it with anything, with enough tweaking and drifting, though.

    Thinking about it a bit, I actually think a DitV hack would work well. Show up, discover situation, handle situation, go home.. Works for me. Less so my own ReCoil, as the mechanics are tied more closely to the fictional events than the story structure. Besides, in ReCoil you ARE the ghosts. Seems like it'd be a little messed up to play the game where you bust the ghosts.

  • The West End Games' Ghostbusters game did have several innovations that lead to the development of key Story Game concepts - like traits that were made up by the player and not taken from a crafted list. It was an inspiration for "Over the Edge", which really got the Indie RPG community humming...

    It was also a really fun time!
  • Sorcerer.

    Not only are there free-floating demons to be contacted (PKE meter), punished (ghost traps) and bound (the containment unit), you've Venkman's womanising, Egon's obsessions, and an easy humanity scale - ghostbusters have real problems dealing with ordinary problems like rent and relationships.

    Yeah, InSpectres.
  • edited May 2009
    I've heard of the west end games ghostbusters but am i, being a newb and such, able to get even pdf's of such a game. Is it supported and if it is not (effectively being abandonware?) can i get an semilegal pdf?

    I've heard of inspectre's before but ive never seen anything about it, whys inspectres so awesome for ghostbusters. Is it a nameless adaptation (I think something called Ectobusters I seen somewhere ).

    I've also seen calls for Savage Worlds which I am a bit more familure with. What say you oh sages of Gozer!

    Also how do confessionals transfer/work with Ghostbusters

    L
  • d6 Ghostbusters is one of the greatest games of the hobby, it was hilarious and no you can't get it anywhere, forever, the end.
  • JD is right (yeah, saying that still makes my arm go numb).

    So... InSpectres. You'll be glad you did.
  • Huh...my first reaction to this thread was shock and horror...a regular Story Games poster whose barely familiar with one of the foundational story games titles?!

    5,6, 7 years ago that really couldn't have happened. It would be hard to imagine someone active in the "community" at the time who didn't know InSpectres...at least with a fair familarity. If you were one of the "regulars" you probably owned it, probably played it, and there's a very good chance that it was one of the tranformative games in your gaming experience.

    Then I thought...so that means...we've grown past the point where everybody "in the know" knows InSpectres and the Pool and so many of those other titles that defined the early days of indie-dom...and that's probably a good thing.

    So yeah, check out InSpectres, its not as screamingly bleeding edge as it was when it came out because the edge has moved a great deal since then...but I can say with some certainty that it was one of the games that directly inspired the moving of that edge. I think InSpectres has to part of anyone's list of "Canonical Indie Designs".

    I know its on my list of "Don't try and design an RPG unless you've played game X" games.
  • Posted By: Valamireverybody "in the know" knows InSpectres and the Pool
    I confess my ignorance of the Pool. I'm saying my hail Mary's right now, and am going off to do my research.
  • Posted By: hanselI confess my ignorance of the Pool. I'm saying my hail Mary's right now, and am going off to do my research.
    For Hansel and anybody else who's interested: The Pool
  • Ralph, call somebody a whippersnapper! Pretty please?

    Weird how we've grown, isn't it?
  • Get off my lawn!
  • I'm probably not a representative example of the new wave by any means ( I have an allergy to most things indie, forge, knife fight, various others all just stick in my craw. ) which probably explains it by a large amount.

    that said 6-7 years ago is almost a goddamned decade. At some point things stops being required reading and just starts becoming historical incidents (i seem to design okay without having read and sworn upon the inspecre's bible. ).

    However, before we gleefully derail over the edge of old vs new, wise vs ignorant, net vs community, please can someone explain to me how confessionals help ghostbusting aside from serving as a narrative mechanic to give the players a chance to introduce new things without seeming like power ursurping gm wannabies? Im only working from the start up rules because im cheap, and i perfer lite to stuff.
  • Posted By: Josh RobyPosted By: hanselI confess my ignorance of the Pool. I'm saying my hail Mary's right now, and am going off to do my research.
    For Hansel and anybody else who's interested:The Pool

    Huh. I read that real quick-like. I can see how that would have been real neat when it first came out, but there's nothing in it that really makes me want to play it.

    Logos: Having only read InSpectres, I can say that it also seems to me that the confessional aspect doesn't particularly reinforce a GB feel. But take your wisdom from those who've actually played it.
  • edited May 2009
    Posted By: Logos7... please can someone explain to me how confessionals help ghostbusting aside from serving as a narrative mechanic to give the players a chance to introduce new things without seeming like power ursurping gm wannabies?
    Well, there's that, for starters. But in my limited experience, I've seen confessionals used to do three neat things:

    "Man, that was tough, what with Bob being such a coward."

    "Man, that was tough - the way those bugs came out of the walls!"

    "Man, that was tough. I really didn't think I'd have the confidence to get through it."

    In the first example, the player gave another character a personality trait they could optionally play to. Or play entirely against - so why did the confessor think Bob was a coward? In the second, the player set up a subsequent threat. And in the third, the player got to explain a bit of how their character was thinking - and that's still not something you see in a lot of designs.

    Ghostbusting-wise, that technique is going to add a bit of optional depth to characters, without weighing them down with personality traits. And it's another way the players can throw a spanner in the works, sot he GM doesn't have to do all the work.
  • And in sillier games, it gets used for:

    "Man, that was tough. But that was when Frank and Pepé's eyes met, and they were never going to be separated again."
  • So does people think there is comedic gold in confesionals?

    If there is , it will go a long way to me keeping them in the game.
  • Yes, Logos. Confessionals can be HUGELY funny.
  • Yeah, I've read it but haven't played it, and I got the sense that InSpectres was supposed to be less "Ghostbusters!" and more "Ghostbusters as a reality-tv show!" Which sounds pretty cool to me. Why haven't I played this yet?
  • edited May 2009
    Great googly moogly is there comedy GOLD in confessionals.

    Don't ditch them! Sacrilege.

    My favourite use for confessionals is to set up future events:

    "Of course, we didn't know it at the time, but turning down that coffee was the best move we could have made."

    (from actual play) "We were very grateful to Denise when that blanket turned out to be useful later"

    "Who would have thought that a inflatable scale model of the Taj Mahal would turn out to be the solution to all our problems?"

    At the time, probably nobody, including the player saying this, has any idea how these things will pay off. Finding out is great, and frequently HILARIOUS.

    (You have to be careful not to throw out TOO much stuff like this, because then the resolution gets overloaded with too much stuff to deal with. But then, that's what the one per scene limit is for. As GM, call out when scenes are soon to end and no-one has confessed yet, and watch the unruly scuffle as people dive for the chair.)
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