Making connections at DexCon 12/Young adult games

I have a friend who, through his job as a librarian, is bringing a bunch of 13-17 year olds to DexCon. I have this vague idea that there are some indie games out there that were made for this age group, but I certainly can't remember what they are. So here's what I'm asking:

1) Can you think of any games that are especially well-suited for a table of rowdy teenage boys?

2) Are you interested in having his kids pointed at a particular game session you are running? You can pretty much be assured of a full table if I do this, as he'll have about a dozen kids and young adults with him.

Comments

  • Good on your librarian friend! That's fantastic.
    Posted By: Andrew Morris1) Can you think of any games that are especially well-suited for a table of rowdy teenage boys?
    3:16 comes to mind, as does D&D 4e.
  • I like the feel of Jaws of the Six Serpents (Conan styled sword and sorcery powered by the PDQ system) but I haven't run it yet to know anything more.

    3:16
    Misspent Youth? for the older kids?
  • I'm running several sessions of The Final Girl, which is a horror movie game. Pretty easy to pick up and run with. If they like horror movies, I'd love to have them at my table.

    Warning: Game may contain scenes of violence.
  • Oh, hey, are the rambunctious teens already gamers?
  • Jason, would you recommend Grey Ranks for /actual/ teenagers?
  • Sure I would. I'd pitch it to them honestly and let them decide if it was something they were interested in. The vibe I got from Andrew's post was that these were people who had an express desire to tear shit up, and if true that's commendable but not really the game's target audience. I've never played Grey Ranks with teenagers but I'd really like to. They would probably find it unbearably corny.

    Another game to point them at: Misery Bubblegum.
  • Jason, they are from the gaming group he runs for local kids at the library, so they've had some exposure to D&D, but are still pretty new to it. At least that's the impression I got from him. I'll check in and verify that.


    I know absolutely nothing about 3:16. It's like, space marines, or something?

    I had considered Misspent Youth, and my friend thought they might go for something like that. I'd want to hear from Rob before I pointed a horde of teenage gamers-in-training his way, though.

    I'll look into The Final Girl and Jaws of the Six Serpents, as I don't really know anything about them, either.

    I think Misery Bubblegum might be too touchy-feelie for them, but I'll run it past my friend. I think he did say something about most of them being anime fans or something.


    Thanks for the suggestions, and keep them coming.
  • I'm good with teenagers playing the game as long as they have an OK from their parents.

    I'm a little worried they're going to be all, "Old man, this is not how teenagers rebel."
  • Posted By: Robert BohlI'm a little worried they're going to be all, "Old man, this is not how teenagers rebel."
    Wouldn't that be an interesting data point, either way?

    And I believe he gets parental consent forms from everybody's parents for the outing. I'll check how the form is worded this weekend.
  • Posted By: Andrew MorrisWouldn't that be an interesting data point, either way?
    Certainly! My shame at being a bad representor of youthful rebellion is separable from my fascination in the empirical question.
  • Andrew, maybe the thing to do is show them the schedule and see what excites them. Socializing with regular folks is probably better than dedicated tables just for their lunatic selves. Maybe that's not really practical, hard to say, but if they are already gaming at the library, chances are they will do well at whatever games they are interested in.

    3:16, a very clever game that is ostensibly about space marines murdering everything in sight but is actually about something else entirely.
  • Posted By: Jason Morningstar
    3:16, a very clever game that is ostensibly about space marines murdering everything in sight but is actually about something else entirely.
    Ooh, now it actually sounds interesting. I'd just assumed it was some sort of Christianity-themed RPG (thinking the title was a reference to John 3:16). So what is the "something else" that it is actually about?
  • I can't speak for Jason's something else, but for me it typically either turns into a satirical look at the whole genre or more often an exploration of obedience and/or morality. I'm sure a lot of people out there run the game as a pure "kill the ugly, bad stuff" mission after mission, but for me I always end up using it as the RPG version of Milgram's obedience studies in order to see how far the players/characters will go. For example, in one game I ran we had a couple of missions involving nasty aliens (bugs and such), before I moved them on to a planet of pacifist ewoks. It was really interesting to see the players react when they discovered they were supposed to wipe out a planet of harmless teddy bears: I got one of those great double-takes from one of the players and some nervous glances before one of the players said "Yes sir!" I could tell it made a couple of the players kind of uncomfortable which was the point - we still talk about the game months later.
  • A one-shot of 3:16 is always going to be about space marines murdering everything in sight. It's very fun on that level. As characters are promoted, they receive new general orders, and these become more thought-provoking as ranks increase. So in extended play, players are confronted with essentially impossible/conflicting/repulsive general orders that form the fabric of the game.
  • The Final Girl is about people being killed by monsters.
  • So I talked to my friend, and here's the background on the group. He runs a roleplaying club at his library, and has a mixed group of 13-17 year old boys and girls. For the most part, the boys play D&D (with lots of fighting) and the girls play Vampire: the Requiem (with lots of conversation). So they have a bit of gaming experience.
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