[Hot War] Hot War Transmission in Full Colour Print Spectacular

We're delighted to say the first issue of the Hot War Transmission, the new quarterly mini-supplement for Hot War, is now available in a lavish, full colour print version. Priced at £5 (plus P&P), this 36 page booklet contains a host of great Hot War game material.

Issue 1 focuses on the work of the late, great Nigel Kneale, creator of the hugely influential Quatermass TV series and films. Inside the Transmission you'll find a guide to Quatermass, with useful hints about incorporating situations and themes into your games, locations from the series and films, and a Kneale-esque game situation created by Scott Dorward. The game situation gives you background, antagonists, and four pre-generated characters, making ideal for convention play or for slotting in to your own games.

The booklet can be purchased direct from our own online shop. It will also be available through Indie Press Revolution in the next two to three weeks. You can also download the PDF of this first issue for free (future issues will be available through Drive-Thru RPG, priced at $4).

Details
Title: The Hot War Transmission, Volume 1, Issue 1
Authors: Malcolm Craig and Scott Dorward
Cover Artist: Paul Bourne
Price: £5 + P&P (print); FREE (PDF)

Hot War is a game of friends, enemies, secrets, and lies set in a post-apocalyptic 1960s London. You can find out more by visiting the Contested Ground website and downloading our free previews.

This booklet is a bit of a departure for us, as it's the first time we've ever done a book in full colour. It's also not something particularly associated with small press productions. However, Gregor Hutton recommended that we use a company called A Local Printer, who use environmentally friendly papers and printing products. The paper is Forest Stewardship Council Certified, which basically means it comes from recognised sustainable sources. It provides a viable alternative to recycled paper, which is nice.

Cheers
Malcolm

Comments

  • I downloaded this issue after seeing you discuss it on the thread over on therpgsite and it is really impressive. Even if you aren't going to use it for Hot War, it's a great reference to the Quartermass series (with footnotes and everything!) and chock full of great gaming material. You could really port the adventure in here to almost any genre. Great stuff and a cool initiative.
  • You, sir, are maximum awesome.

    Walker, we should play Hot War together sometime. It's a really neat game.

  • I would love to. Let's see if we can make that happen in the next possible Atlantic coast connection we make.

    I have to admit that I'm a bit intimidated by Cold City and Hot War. I'm a big consumer of British genre fiction. John Christopher is one of my all-time favourite authors and I love all the other great classics of literature and television that came out of Britian's post-war anxiety. But I feel that I wouldn't be a strong producer of it. I get the British mindset from that period, but I really don't know if I could capture it for others. I think this is why I've been hesitant to dive into these games since they are otherwise so much in my wheelhouse. So that's a long way of saying if you want to take charge, I would be totally psyched to participate.
  • edited July 2010
    Hey guys,

    Thanks for the kind comments. The issue of the British cultural milieu and mindset was actually raised by Jason in a discussion elsewhere (actually, in the rpgsite thread that you mentioned) and it prompted me to write this (which relates primarily to Hot War, rather than Cold City:

    It has always been my hope with Hot War that the way the game is presented would help people understand the setting and milleu in a way that gets past the "I know nothing about Britain in the 1960s!" gut reaction. The majority of the game development actually took place while I was living in New Zealand, with great success. Although, it must be admitted that there are strong cultural links between NZ and the UK that still exist.

    It's been my experience that people unfamiliar with the time period actually do have more of a grasp than they thought: the archetypes of 'Swinging London', the Beatles, even Austin Powers movies. Even these little associations with British culture of the early 60s are often present and can help form the basis for understanding.

    To flick back to your initial paragraph, there is a certain 'Britishness' about the game and its setting. It is very firmly rooted in the work of J G Ballard, John Wydham, TV series such as 'Quatermass and the Pit', and films such as 'The War Game' and 'Threads'. All of these present a British view of the apocalypse, horror, SF, and the nuclear threat. Yet, many of these basic ideas are touchstones that we are all familiar with.

    In the end, I don't think lack of familiarity would be a barrier to enjoying the game. I certainly can't seen any more difficulty than coming new to Greyhawk or the Cthulhu Mythos, for example (although, I'll admit that those are both settings which are far more expansively detailed and in-depth that Hot War!). Each group would, and should, create their own vision of the UK in post-apocalypse 1963. If that's a vision coming from Sean Connery era 'James Bond' movies rather than the nuclear brutality of 'Threads' or the new-wave stylings of Ballard, then that's far from a problem. Things like the Player's Primer in the back of the book should, I hope, give a fictional framework that people can hang things on. But, it's not proscriptive.


    Although, if you end up playing a game with Joshua (and I sincerely hope you do), do not under any circumstances let him play James Bond.

    Cheers
    Malcolm
  • Awesome stuff as usual.
    I really want to try this out as a player before I GM it. Unlikely but that is how things go.
  • I got my print copy this morning and it looks gorgeous - I'd forgotten it was full colour so it was a nice surprise!
    Posted By: walkerpJohn Christopher is one of my all-time favourite authors
    I know that Scott, one of the authors of the first Transmission, has ran a Hot War scenario inspired by the Death of Grass (called Things Fall Apart, if I remember correctly). I wouldn't be surprised if it turns up in a future issue...

    Andrew
  • edited July 2010
    Posted By: Andrew Kenrick

    I know that Scott, one of the authors of the first Transmission, has ran a Hot War scenario inspired by the Death of Grass (called Things Fall Apart, if I remember correctly). I wouldn't be surprised if it turns up in a future issue...

    Andrew
    The next issue (the 'politics' issue), in fact. Handy that! Having Scott's game situations in the Transmission is a real bonus. Although, it will be nearly nine months before my favourite one, 'Victory Girls', appears in print.
    Posted By: SilverlionAwesome stuff as usual.
    I really want to try this out as a player before I GM it. Unlikely but that is how things go.
    Hey Tim,

    Well, If I'm ever in your neck of the woods, I'll have to sit down and have a game with you!

    Cheers
    Malcolm
  • Oooh! And here's a photo of the full colouryness!

    image

    Cheers
    Malc
  • Wow!

    You release this while I'm out the country, eh? I'll grab a copy when I'm back home.

    That printing looks fantastic by the way. Paul's layout is immense and the colour print really "pops", and the writing is, of course, top notch.
  • Posted By: Gregor HuttonWow!

    You release this while I'm out the country, eh? I'll grab a copy when I'm back home.

    That printing looks fantastic by the way. Paul's layout is immense and the colour print really "pops", and the writing is, of course, top notch.
    Well, you will go jaunting off around the USA on a well deserved extended holiday just when I'm actually being productive for a change!

    Full colour was definitely the way to go with the printing. More expensive, for sure, but it certainly makes the product stand out a mile. Your recommendation about A Local Printer was spot on. They really have done a very nice job with the Transmission. Everything about the printing is very crisp and rich.

    And, excitingly, Paul has just recently sent me his work-in-progress for the cover of Issue 2. Even at this early stage, it's looking creepily brilliant. I'll never be able to look at a Royal Mail postage stamp in the same way ever again.

    Cheers
    Malcolm
Sign In or Register to comment.