What is your favorite game?

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  • edited May 2016
    Simon, I'm very happy with people putting in their own games because that means that they make games they care about and are passionate about.
    I just want folks to note that, say "My favorite game is my own game, Time Pilot 2097" instead of "My favorite game is Time Pilot 2097".

    Because every time I've seen someone talking about While the World Ends, it's been Wilhem. That's not been the case for Drakar & Bananer or Svart av Kval. (Or Wilhelm's The Daughters of Verona, for that matter.)

    Simon, you and Arvid and I were part of what I consider my very best gaming memory of all time, that O Coco band game that started out as an attempt to play Psychodrame but accidentally got good. So I hope you know that I bear no ill will against you and would love to play more games with you if you were to visit this mythic city again.

    And Wilhelm, I know that The Daughters of Verona is beloved by many. Keep on making your good games. All I wanted to say is that it somehow, and I know this is a bit paradoxical / weird, makes me less interested in the games when I look them up and find out "Oh, he was promoting his own game" as happened the first time I checked out While the World Ends so many years ago.

    I'm all about the Jante style, maybe too much. I didn't mean anything ill by it. Maybe I'll rethink this.
  • edited May 2016
    Simon, I'm very happy with people putting in their own games because that means that they make games they care about and are passionate about.
    I just want folks to note that, say "My favorite game is my own game, Time Pilot 2097" instead of "My favorite game is Time Pilot 2097".
    I was thinking I covered that by starting my next paragraph with "Excluding games I've written myself", but I guess I could've been clearer, fair point. Edited it for maximum clarity. :)

    PS: I'd love to game with you again, too! I'm sure it can be arranged sometime.
  • I looked at dream askew a few months ago but just skimmed it when I was going over lots of PbTA games. I'll have to take a more in depth look
  • Phew, good! I was thinking you soured on me after that telepathy game we played at TullCon. I thought that game was good enough even though it didn't strike the same golden notes as O Coco
  • One of my favorite games, and I think quite compatible with your stated taste and current thoughts, @soyosauce, is Sign in Stranger. The designer doesn't currently have it for sale, but you can find a version of it on her website (look under "Games in Development").

    It's an alien world exploration games. Everyone collaborates on some world elements, and then the characters go there, and whenever we need to know what they encounter next, we draw a random element and describe only in sensory details. There is no GM, and no one knows what anything means or is good for until the characters earn that knowledge with successful investigation (at which point the relevant player defines as needed).

    It is just as nifty and creative as it sounds, and also way more immersive than it sounds.
  • I will check it out! Sounds great, thanks!
  • Hey, why not take advantage of this thread to push some of my most favorite games nobody ever talks about? (I'm deliberately avoiding games already mentioned in recent threads around here)

    What about:

    Wilhelm Person's Okult.

    Matthijs Holter's Society of Dreamers.

    Ben Lehman's Amidst Endless Quiet.
  • I don't know any of those either!
  • Hey, why not take advantage of this thread to push some of my most favorite games nobody ever talks about?
    Or make a thread specifically for favorites games no one else talks about. I'd love to see that.
  • (Simon, would you tell us more about Prosopopée? That's a new name for most of us here, I'd imagine!)
  • edited May 2016
    Yeah
  • If you're asking only for games designed specifically to be purely, or at least primarily, narrative I can't answer since what qualifies as such will vary from person to person.

    If you're instead interested just in what RPGs people who focus on narrative enjoy, then (in no particular order):

    D&D (BECMI through 2nd edition, plus our own version)
    Shadowrun (1st-3rd edition hybrid)
    cWoD (mostly Vampire and Werewolf, with a dash of modified Hunter)
    Gamma World (1st-3rd edition hybrid)
    Frontiers (our own Boot Hill clone/mod)
    Stupid Heroes (our own, somewhat akin to FASERIP Marvel and DC Heroes)
    Star Wars (WEG d6 1st/2nd)
    Star Trek (FASA)
    Top Secret SI
    Mouse Guard
    Rifts
    TMNT
    Warhammer FRP (1st-2nd)
    Call of Cthulhu
    MERP/Rolemaster
    Traveller (mostly Mega, but with some modding)

    *can you say 'Grognard'? 8-)
  • (Simon, would you tell us more about Prosopopée? That's a new name for most of us here, I'd imagine!)
    Gladly! Prosopopée is an amazing French game written by Frédéric Sintes, availible from the Limbic Systems website: http://www.limbicsystemsjdr.com/boutique/prosopopee/

    If you know French, you should buy this game. If you don't know French, you should learn French, then buy this game.

    The genre is surrealist fantasy. The players are painters who are painting a picture, and the picture is a world. They are using seven colors, one of which is Humans. After having painted the picture, they notice it is unbalanced, and the problem is related to the humans. In order to solve the problem, some of them incarnate themselves into the painting, becoming Mediums (PCs). One or two remain outside the painting and are called Nuances (GMs-ish). Together they attempt to find the source of the imbalance and correct it.

    The game brilliantly uses rules for how players are allowed to talk to each other. For example, nothing in the world has a name, and you can never name a thing. And you can never interrupt a player who is talking, but must wait until they are done. This creates a wonderful, evocative, descriptive, slow rhythm in the game, which fits the surrealist genre to a T. The game is very hard to explain, but it's very different from other games I've played and changed a lot of how I think about RPGs.

    Some examples of things I've played in it:

    In a city resembling Venice, triangles are forbidden, since they are passages to the land of the dead. Recently, more and more spirits have begun to haunt the city. The strange companions end up travelling to the realm of the dead to find out why they are not reincarnating. They have become greedy and haughty, insisting that only a life as a human is woth living, and refuse to reincarnate as anything else. In the final scene, the three companions walk through the three triangles, one reincarnating as a tree, one as a raven and one as a human, thus leading the spirits by example.

    Another painting is a world which is a ring inside a ring. In the inner ring, the king of steel and diesel is manufacturing hunger and desire with his terrible machines, guarded by flaming monkeys. A memorable phrase of the game: "The desire machine thus becomes aware of its own existence, and explodes from despair". sSmetimes in this game you realize you've said the weirdest things, but they always make sense in context, which is, in my mind, a sign of great surrealism. Another memorable phrase from a different game: "O, legless man who is riding a goat, throw us your beard so we can pull you ashore!". In context, it made perfect sense (for example, the man had given his legs to a poor girl who was sad because she couldn't dance), but out of context it's ridiculous.

    In a game I facilitated at LinCon a few weeks ago, a man who had fish inside his eyes pulled out a squid, squeezed it to produce ink, and used the ink to teach the humans to write books and stories, so they wouldn't need to steal stories from other bubble-worlds.
  • It's okay, phoenix182, I'm a bit of a grognard too.

    In that vein, I'm going to throw Gangbusters out there, especially when played with a criminal campaign focus. It becomes a bit like Boardwalk Empire: The Game, with the focus on the business end of things. You're a petty criminal with big dreams. Get Rich or Die Tryin' in the prohibition era.

    For sheer fun, a chopped back version of Mythic GM Emulator used as the engine for the more open form minis-using play I talk a lot about. The core resolution chart could use a lot of pruning back and modification, but the rest of it works a treat. It works especially well if you've come with a core idea and general situation, maybe a few things you as the creator of the set up would like to see in there (if the opportunity presents itself), and then a fairly laid back, go with it, make t up on the fly attitude in actual play.

    There are bunches of other games I like, but those two don't get nearly as much love.

  • I played quite a bit of AW derivatives but In A Wicked Age is still my favorite. Most *fulfilling life purpose on planet feeling* per hour
  • I'm super glad I made this forum. Really opening me up to a lot of games id never heard of. Thanks so much for everyone sharing!
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